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Staying active during pregnancy is always a good move for you and your baby. Most women can typically get back into the groove of their usual pre-pregnancy exercise routine, and some even incorporate additional exercises like walking or swimming to stay fit during their pregnancy.

Exercise is essential throughout pregnancy to help prepare the body for labor. Studies have shown that women who are active throughout their pregnancy, including things like walking, swimming, and other light forms of movement into their daily routine, may have smoother deliveries, healthier babies, and take less time to recover.

It is also crucial that you nourish your body with a diet that is rich in nutrients along with your daily dose of vitamins and minerals that have been recommended by your doctor. If you work out on a regular basis, more nutrients may be needed during your pregnancy. The main goal should be to nourish your own body as well as your growing baby’s body. 

Exercising while pregnant provides loads of fantastic benefits for both mom (less duration in labor and quicker weight loss) and the baby (less colic and greater physical resilience). Not only that, but exercising is also prone to making most moms happier, less anxious, and ultimately more in touch with their bodies. It only makes sense for gestating mamas to want to commit to be fit as much as possible.

Exercise is proven to increase your mood, and can also amp up your energy levels. Focus that energy on exercises you enjoy (especially walking, swimming, stretching, pilates, or other mild activities). For an extra boost, try working out outside when possible. Spending time outside during pregnancy is good for you, so don’t be afraid to expose yourself to natural light and get that good old Vitamin D.

Here we’ll list some of the most commonly recommended workouts during pregnancy.

Walking helps to increase circulation and aligns the pelvis while also giving you a good way to be active at a level you can handle. Make an attempt to walk for a half hour to an hour a day.

Another great exercise for pregnant women is swimming. Besides the fact that it can help soothe the discomfort of baby aches, swimming also toughens stomach muscles, may help with the alignment of the pelvis, and is generally recommended to ensure the baby’s correct position for delivery. If you’re not the greatest swimmer, take it easy in the beginning. Make sure to warm up before starting your swim. Swimming is also great in the way that it leaves you feeling weightless, taking the burden of the baby’s weight off of you for a little bit.

Pelvic floor exercises, also known as Kegels, are advised to help extend the muscles between your legs that go from the pubic bone to your back. These are the muscles used to control the flow of urine.Your best bet is to squeeze these muscles 10-15 times in a row to build them up. Kegels can also relieve the sensitivity during sex and incontinence.

Lots of women are capable of squatting, lunging, and weightlifting during pregnancy, but it still wouldn’t hurt to get the okay from your obgyn before getting engaging in intense physical activities like these. These types of exercises can help with keeping your core strong during pregnancy while also improving muscle tone throughout delivery. Certain women should not partake in these workouts, especially those who have placenta problems, a history of muscle tightness, or other concerns, so it’s important to get your doctor’s approval first.

During your pregnancy, avoid all contact sports or any activity that includes the risk of falling. Make sure to stay away from just about anything that will put pressure on the joints and hips, hard yoga positions, or going for a jog without speaking with a doctor beforehand.

Although most exercises are deemed fine for pregnancy, countless women find themselves feeling limited by how they feel at different points in pregnancy and make an attempt to adjust regular workout routines to fit their fluctuating hormones and growing bellies.

Note that different forms of exercise are okay at different points of pregnancy. Lifting weights, laying on your back, and cardio are fine within the first trimester. Recognize what feels good for your body, and what does not. Cut yourself some slack if you need to take a break at any point. Lifting weights and doing cardio are still okay during the second trimester, but at that point you should hold off on any back work for the rest of your pregnancy.

Once you’ve reached the third trimester, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists encourages continuing with any well-tolerated forms of pregnancy exercises, perhaps just modifying the duration or intensity of the exercises. Walking can actually help get labor going! Staying active will help your physical and mental state, especially as the time of delivery is approaching. Once your baby is born, workouts are going to be difficult to fit in, and you want to try and take it easy as you spend time with your little miracle.

I do, however, encourage you to continue walking after delivery if you are able to (this will depend on the mode of delivery and if there were any complications). Remember, monitoring hydration and environmental temperature during any kind of exercise is very important to both your and your baby’s health.

With pregnancy, the trick is to work out in moderation. So make it your goal to exercise the right amount without pushing your limits.  If you are still unsure about what workout is best for your pregnancy, chat with Dr. Ghea, a female obgyn in Fort Lauderdale, and she will provide you with all the information and women’s health tips you need so that those nine months can be a fun, healthy, and comfortable experience for you. Appointments can be set up with her at Westside OB/GYN Group, a Plantation obgyn office, by calling 954-473-2011.

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