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When it comes to methods of contraception and your health, there are a multitude of options and approaches you can take in order to prevent an unwanted pregnancy, STD, or STI. However, you should always be aware of the effects of each individual contraceptive method, and how they will affect your health.

About two thirds of women in America utilize some form of birth control at some point in their lives. Options can range from something disposable like a condom, to something that has to be implemented into your daily or weekly routine such as birth control pills and birth control patches. There is also the option of the vaginal ring, which has to be replaced monthly, and a birth control shot that you must remember to go back and get every 3 months.

Last December, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a report on the present state of contraception, including which ones were the most common methods. The report is based upon statistics uncovered from the 2015–2017 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), which questioned 5,554 women about their birth control use in the previous month.

The reports showed the most popular contraceptive methods women choose. Female sterilization ranked at 18.6 percent, with the birth control following in popularity at 12.6 percent.  Implants and intrauterine devices (IUDs) came in at 10.3 percent, and male condoms at 8.7 percent. 

It is difficult to assume which method is best for you without consulting the right doctor to suit your needs and lifestyle. Dr. Ghea, a female obgyn in Fort Lauderdale, can help you pick the ideal method of contraception for your body and your preferences. Each kind of contraception requires individual testing and/or considerations prior to initiation. It is important to know the health risks of each type of contraception just as it is important to note that they do not protect you from STDs. Therefore, it is highly recommended to play it safe by regularly using condoms to lessen the risk.

If you decide to get started with the pill, it is essential for you to take your birth control pill daily, or you may not be protected from pregnancy. Take advantage of birth control reminder Apps on your phone, set alarms, or keep your pill pack next to items you use on a day-to-day basis (i.e. your toothbrush or phone charger) to help you remember.

Keep in mind that the hormones in the pill can alter your level of sexual desire. You may also experience spotting or bleeding between periods, sore breasts, nausea, or headaches. Most side effects of the pill typically go away after two or three months once your body has fully adjusted. Many people use the pill without any issues.

If you have a busy schedule and feel as if you might have a hard time keeping track of your pill dosage every day, you might want something more low-maintenance like IUDs. These take little-to-no thought on a daily basis, and there is no risk of missing a pill or shot.

Some women face side effects after getting an IUD. They generally go away in about 3–6 months, once your body gets accustomed to it in your uterus. Side effects may involve pain once the IUD is inserted, cramping or backaches a few days after getting it, spotting between periods, irregular periods, or heavier periods and worse menstrual cramps.

If you are unsure of which method of contraception is best for you and are searching for an obgyn in Plantation, Dr. Ghea is happy to assist you. Schedule an appointment with her at Westside OB/GYN Group, a Plantation obgyn office, by calling 954-473-2011.

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