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Whether you’re traveling by car, bus, or train, it is typically safe to travel while you’re pregnant; however, there are a few things to make note of that could make your trip safer and more comfortable. 

Always buckle up whenever you ride in a car and keep the airbags turned on. This is a rule of thumb to follow whether you are pregnant or not! Try to limit the time you spend cooped up in the car, bus, or train. Take frequent breaks if possible. Use rest stops to take short strolls and do stretches. This will help maintain blood circulation. 

Traveling by air is considered safe for pregnant women up until a certain point. The second trimester would probably be the best time to fly. Later, your growing belly could make airport maneuvers less comfortable. 

Most airlines have narrow aisles and smaller bathrooms, so it could be challenge to walk and may be uncomfortable when you need to use the restroom. Due to potential turbulence that could cause the plane to shake, hold on to the seat backs while navigating the aisle. Avoid gassy foods (i.e., beans, cabbage, broccoli). They could make you more uncomfortable in-flight. Stay hydrated during the flight. If you get dehydrated, it can diminish blood flow to the uterus. Pick an aisle seat so it’s easier for you to get up when you need to use the restroom, or simply to stretch your legs and back. Try to walk every half hour or so during a smooth flight. It’ll help keep blood flowing. In the seat, flex and extend your ankles to improve circulation. Schedule a check up with your ob-gyn before you leave and consider travel insurance should your plans need to change. Some international flights prohibit travel after 28 weeks. Check with your airline prior to booking Travel is not recommended for pregnant women in areas where Zika infection is ongoing. For up to date travel advisories check wwwnc,cdc,gov/travel/notices/ 

It’s recommended for women who have complicated pregnancies with risk factors for premature labor, preeclampsia, soon-to-be-momma’s carrying multiples, to avoid travel later in pregnancy. Risk factors that warrant travel considerations would include things like severe anemia, cardiac disease, respiratory disease, labile hypertension, a recent hemorrhage, or current or recent bone fractures. 

Traveling overseas is safe for the most part for pregnant women, but the motion of the boat can bring out any morning sickness or make you feel nauseous all over again. Follow these guidelines to avoid and you will be smooth sailing! 

Check with the cruise line to make sure that there’s a health care provider on board in case you experience any pregnancy complications. Look over the route and port-of-calls to see if there’s access to any medical facilities if needed. Make sure any medications for seasickness are approved for pregnant women and that there’s no risk to the developing baby. Seasickness bands use acupressure points to help prevent an upset tummy and may be a good alternative to medication. 

If you are traveling internationally, it’s important to speak with your health care provider before your trip to address safety factors for you and your baby. Go over immunizations with your health care provider and carry a copy of your health records with you. 

When it comes to international travel, you could be exposed to a disease that is rare here in the United States, but is common in the country you visit. 

Diarrhea, for example is a common concern when traveling overseas because you’re not used to the germs and organisms found in the food and water of other countries. This can lead to dehydration. To avoid this, be sure to drink lots of bottled water, or use a reusable bottle of your own to refill. You can also avoid getting sick and get the most out of your travels by: 

Making sure the milk is pasteurized. Avoiding fresh fruits and veggies unless they’ve been cooked or peeled (i.e. orange, banana) Making sure all the meat and fish has been cooked the right amount. Don’t eat it if it seems questionable. Dressing comfortably and wearing comfy shoes. Bringing your go-to pillow. Carrying healthy snacks with you. 

If you’re traveling any distance, don’t forget to carry a copy of your prenatal records. 

If your travel plans involve you and your young children high up in the air, here are some of the best tips to follow to make toddler air travel more bearable

Take advantage of an aisle seat. Your little tot might beg to see what’s out the window, but you’ll be glad you’re in the aisle seat when you start losing track of how many times your fidgety toddler wants to get out of their seat to walk, asks you for something else that’s stored in the overhead bin, or needs a trip to the bathroom. 

Plan wisely for the security line. Your best bet is to have a light, foldable stroller for when going through security. It’ll make your life easier to fold it up when it’s your turn and place it on the conveyor belt. You’ll probably want the stroller to keep your kid moving while you’re in the airport. Verify with your airline to be sure, you might be able to check it in at the curb, ticket counter, or gate, or take it right down the jet way and leave it at the plane’s door before you board. If that’s the case, it’ll be waiting for you at the door once you land. Slip-on shoes (for you and your toddler) are also a great idea at the security checkpoint. 

If you’re by yourself, don’t be timid about asking the flight crew for assistance. It can be almost impossible to lift a bag and put it in the overhead bin while holding a child. So ask a flight attendant (or fellow passenger) for a hand, they should be happy to help. And while you’re at it, consider asking for extra pillows, blankets, or water if necessary. 

Remember that there’s no such thing as over packing supplies. Bring as many snacks and toys as you can fit into your carry-on luggage. Snack ideas include mini sandwiches, cut-up vegetables, and string cheese. Bring twice as many diapers as you could possibly need (if your toddler is still wearing them), endless wipes and hand sanitizer, and at least one change of clothes for your child. 

Regulate ear pain by bringing lollipops for takeoff and landing. The sucking will help prevent your child’s little ears from feeling the pain of the air-pressure changes in the cabin during those times. Another method to keep ears clear is to munch on crunchy snacks that require a lot of chewing. Last but not least, try encouraging your toddler to yawn by yawning yourself, as yawns are contagious! This should help pop his or her ears if they get clogged on the plane’s way up or down. 

Childproof your suitcases and carry-ons. Hide anything potentially hazardous or eye-grabbing from your kid. Have your medications stored separately in Ziploc bags for the security line or one-a-day pill containers. Make sure the pills in the baggies stay in their original childproofed bottles and those bags are sealed shut. Pack them in your zipped carry-on luggage if you can’t put them in your checked suitcase. 

If you need more tips on how to handle traveling during pregnancy and/or with your little one, sit down and chat with Dr. Ghea, a top female OBGYN in Fort Lauderdale that would be more than happy to assist you and provide you with other related women’s health tips. You can set up an appointment with her at Westside OB/GYN Group, a Plantation OBGYN office, by calling 954-473-2011 or filling out an online request. 

“Kangaroo care” and “skin-to-skin” are common phrases expectant and new parents eventually have to learn, but while it may be easy to guess what they mean, why do they matter? Let’s go over the benefits of kangaroo care and skin-to-skin contact for both babies and parents. 

So what exactly is Kangaroo Care anyway? 

The phrase “kangaroo care” gets its term for its similarities to how marsupials carry their young. Skin-to-skin care imitates the protective and nurturing setting of a kangaroo pouch. By definition, kangaroo care is developmental care by holding an infant skin-to-skin against the mom or dad’s bare chest. The more you do it, the better — especially in the first two hours after birth, as it will ease your baby into the world. 

Kangaroo care initially emerged in the 1970s as a way to promote bonding and early breastfeeding for full-term infants. In the late 70s, this practice was drawn out to preterm infants because of the over-crowded nurseries, high mortality rates, high infection rates and a lack of resources, like warming devices, or isolettes. Fast forward to almost 50 years, and the practice of kangaroo care is continually practiced in NICUs around the world, based on its profound benefits to both momma and infant. 

The idea of skin-to-skin is a lot like kangaroo care, and in most cases, the terms are used interchangeably. Today, skin-to-skin is generally a term directed to full-term infants, describing how much of the first hours and days of the infant’s life are spent against their mother’s chest, promoting both bonding and the production of breast milk. Kangaroo care is more typically used when someone’s talking about the care a preterm baby in the NICU gets. 

Kangaroo care gives physiological and psychological advantages, both to infants and parents. It can take place any time of day, as frequently as the infant tolerates. It’s recommended daily, for a minimum of one hour, but any amount of kangaroo care can be good for you and your little one. 

There are plenty of benefits of kangaroo care when it comes to infants. It helps the baby adapt through physiologic stability (temperature and blood pressure regulation), it encourages a healthy heart rate and respiratory stability, it boosts their brain cognitive and motor development, improves immunity, promotes a healthy weight gain, helps the baby get better, deep sleep, and minimizes their stress and pain. 

As for the parents, it promotes a better sense of attachment and bonding, increases the milk supply, makes breastfeeding less of a hassle, promotes bonding with dad. 

Infants are often comforted by the sound of their mom or dad’s heartbeat. If your baby starts to get fussy, try covering them with a warm blanket while against your chest and reduce external stimuli. Remember to practice safe skin-to-skin time while staying awake throughout kangaroo care. It’ll promote safe practices at home due to the risk of infant falls and sudden infant death 

syndrome (SIDS). Parents are encouraged to continue skin-to-skin as long as both parents and baby benefit from the experience. 

Don’t get discouraged if a kangaroo attempt doesn’t go how you hoped it would. Give your little one a few days to recuperate, and try again! 

If you need to get started with kangaroo care, you and your partner don’t have to approach it by yourselves. Dr. Ghea, a top female OBGYN in Fort Lauderdale, is the OBGYN to turn to for your journey as a parent and your journey as a woman, with all the beneficial women’s health tips you could ask for. You can set up an appointment with her offices at Westside OB/GYN Group by calling 954-473-2011 or simply filling out an online request. 

Now that you just had your baby, you’ve got a lot to think about: when to feed them, what to do when they cry… 

And how to lose that stubborn baby fat you packed on during your pregnancy. 

Every new mom is eager to get back her pre-baby body, but one of the most important things to keep in mind is to be patient with yourself. 

Here are some tips to help you lose those extra pounds after pregnancy and feel confident in your body again.

Getting back to your pre-pregnancy weight can realistically happen in about 6 to 12 months following delivery. Most women lose half of their baby weight by 6 weeks after childbirth (postpartum). The rest typically comes off over the next set of months. 

A healthy diet with regular exercise will help you drop the pounds. Breastfeeding can also help with postpartum weight loss.

As a new mom, your body needs maximum nutrition, especially if you’re nursing. 

You need to give your body the time to fully recover from childbirth. If you lose weight too quickly after childbirth, it may make your recovery time take longer. Give yourself until your 6-week checkup before making an attempt to slim down. If you’re breastfeeding, wait until your baby is at least 2 months old and your milk supply has normalized before drastically cutting calories.

Set attainable goals, like losing about a pound and a half a week. You can accomplish this by eating healthy foods and incorporating exercise once you’re approved by your OBGYN for regular physical activity.

Women who exclusively breastfeed need about 500 more calories per day than they did before pregnancy. Get these calories from healthy choices like fruits and veggies, whole grains, low-fat dairy, and lean protein.

Whatever you do, make sure you don’t drop below the minimum number of calories you’re required to have. 

If you’re breastfeeding, you’ll want to lose weight at a slow pace. Weight loss that happens too quickly can make you produce less milk. Losing about a pound and a half (670 grams) a week shouldn’t affect your milk supply or your health. 

Breastfeeding causes your body to burn calories, and that will definitely help with losing weight. If you’re patient, you might be in for a pleasant surprise at how much weight you lose naturally while breastfeeding.

There are a few strategies where you can eat to lose weight. These healthy eating tips will help you lose weight safely.

Don’t skip meals! With a new baby, many new moms forget to make time for a meal. If you don’t eat, you’ll have less energy, and it definitely won’t help you lose weight. Aim to eat at least 5 to 6 small meals throughout your day with healthy snacks in between (instead of 3 bigger meals).

Eat breakfast. Even if you aren’t used to having breakfast, get into the habit of eating every morning. Not only will it give you the energy you need to start your day, but it’ll also keep you from feeling drowsy later on.

Slow down. When you take your time eating, you’ll notice that it’s easier to tell that you’re full. As tempting as it may be for you to multitask, try to focus on your meal one bite at a time since you’ll be less prone to overeat.

Pick nonfat or low-fat dairy products

When you’re craving a snack, try to go for foods that include fiber and protein to help keep you full (i.e. raw bell pepper or carrot with bean dip, apple slices with peanut butter, or a slice of whole-wheat toast with a hard-boiled egg). 

Stay hydrated and drink at least 12 cups a day. Keep a water bottle close to where you normally feed the baby. That way you’ll remember to quench your thirst when they do.

Limit drinks like sodas, juices, and other beverages with added sugar and calories. They can add up and make it harder for you to lose weight.

Choose broiled or baked over fried foods.

Limit sweets, sugar, saturated fat and trans fats.

Don’t crash and burn. Avoid going on a crash diet (not eating enough) or a fad diet (popular diets that restrict certain kinds of foods and nutrients). They’ll probably make you drop pounds in the beginning, but those first few pounds you lose are fluids that will come right back. 

Other pounds you lose on a crash diet may be muscle instead of fat. You’ll gain back any fat you lose on a crash diet the moment you get back to your old eating habits. 

Be Realistic. You might not be able to return to your exact pre-pregnancy shape. For many women, pregnancy causes lasting changes in the body. You might have a softer belly, wider hips, and a larger waistline. Make your goals regarding your new body realistic

Exercise will also help you lose fat rather than muscle. 

Once you’re prepared to start losing weight, eat a bit less and move a little more day by day. Although you may feel the urge to push yourself into a hard routine for fast weight loss, rapid weight loss isn’t healthy and takes a toll on your body. 

You don’t want to overdo it. Just a quick walk around the block with your baby in the stroller is a great way to start adding exercise to your daily routine.

If you want more women’s health tips like these or are still struggling to lose that stubborn baby fat, schedule an appointment with Dr. Ghea, a top female OBGYN in Fort Lauderdale, by calling 954-473-2011, visiting her office at Westside OB/GYN Group, or filling out an online request. 

She’ll be more than happy to get you closer to achieving your goal – to be a happy, healthy, and positive role model for your little one!

Let’s face it — talking about certain topics can sometimes make us feel uncomfortable. As kids, many of us were taught that discussing bathroom habits and sexual issues was not acceptable or taboo. It only makes sense then, as grown women, that we generally shy away from bringing up topics related to bladder and bowel control, sexual discomfort, and pain “down there”, which all happen to be symptoms of pelvic floor disorders.

More often than not, women experience symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction, such as pelvic pain, bladder pain, urinary leaks, constipation and pain during sex for six years before pursuing medical help. At times, the muscular pelvic system isn’t quite necessarily the source of the pain, but the muscles are almost always involved in some sort of way.

There are very distinct causes for pelvic pain that lead to very different treatment plans, and these are plans that only a professional can help guide.

Luckily, more healthcare providers are endorsing pelvic floor physical therapy before, or as an alternative to, surgery.

Women who are experiencing any type of pain during sex or pelvic pain in general are encouraged to look into physical therapy as a treatment option. If you’re thinking about seeking pelvic floor therapy, here are some things you should know to be prepared.

For starters, despite popular belief, it’s not solely for new moms. Sturdier, more synchronized pelvic floor muscles are an advantage to everyone, so new mothers aren’t the only ones who benefit from pelvic floor physical therapy.

Another thing to know is how it’s not as invasive as one might believe.

Anything mentioning the term “pelvic” sounds clinical and can make some people automatically picture hospital gowns and feet-in stirrups. The visit will begin by asking questions about your symptoms focusing on those that are most bothersome to you. Your physical therapist should ask for a good amount of information There are certain important factors to address like water intake, how frequently you pee, bowel habits, sexual pain, and taking a look at your back and range of motion. That gives patients a chance to get comfortable with their PT.

Note that pelvic floor rehabilitation is not all about Kegels. Kegels involve contracting and relaxing your pelvic floor muscles, which keeps your uterus and bladder in place above your vagina. The idea is to identify the right muscles to contract and relax. One method is to attempt to stop your stream of pee while you’re peeing. If you are able to do this, you’ve got the basic move figured out. (But don’t start and pause your stream on a regular basis, as that may do harm.)

You also might have to re-learn how to do pelvic floor contractions, or if not at the very least learn how to loosen up overly tight pelvic muscles. More contractions aren’t always the best for you, though. Constantly putting tension on your pelvic floor muscles is almost like perpetually having your shoulders stuck in a shrug. It truly has to do with learning to work your pelvic floor muscles the proper way.

“Urine” trouble” if you can’t figure out what else pelvic floor therapy helps with. Believe it or not, it can help you poop!

It can help with toilet troubles; as bowel dysfunction and constipation are progressively prevalent and a cause of sexual pain and urinary leaks. This is because of toilets being created on higher levels to favor an aging population when we’re supposed to be able to perform “when nature calls” in a squatting position.

It has all to do with strength, and nothing to do with weakness. PT is about understanding how to coordinate pelvic floor muscles so they can stimulate at the right time and relax at other times.

Pelvic pain has become the norm for too many people, but that doesn’t mean you should let it be yours. Fixing your floor is worthwhile, and also helps with menopause symptoms. Because it’s such an intimate relationship, it’s critical that you feel secure with your PT since you’re physically and mentally putting yourself in an extremely vulnerable position. The best way to get over that initial discomfort is to find someone who makes you feel relaxed the moment you step into their room.

If you are looking for treatment advice for pelvic floor rehabilitation as well as other women’s health tips, go ahead and book an appointment with Dr. Ghea, a female obgyn in Fort Lauderdale, by calling 954-473-2011, or visiting Westside OB/GYN Group, a Plantation obgyn office. She is more than willing to help assist you while making sure you are at ease!

It’s that time of the month again, which means all you’re going to want to do is stay under your covers as you desperately wait for the cramps, bloating, and crabbiness to come to an end so you get to feel normal again. The fatigue that you experience when you get your period sometimes makes it hard to find the motivation to do any physical activity.However, having an exercise routine during your menstrual cycle can actually help lessen the symptoms, alleviating the pain that you’re used to feeling. The right workout will allow you to cope with your typical symptoms so you don’t have to allow mother nature to get in the way of your daily life.

The best thing to do while exercising during your period is to pay attention to your body. Staying hydrated and drinking a good amount of water is always necessary when you’re exercising, but it’s especially important throughout your period. If the cramping and bloating is too heavy for you to be out and about, give yourself a freebie from the sweat sesh. But if you’re in the mood to get moving, here are seven recommended workouts that you can do.

Walking is great low-intensity cardio. Go ahead and grab your favorite pair of sneakers and go for a stroll, whether it’s around your neighborhood or through a trail in the park. Though it may not be the most intense method of exercise, you can still keep track of your steps, and burn calories by walking. 

If you’re officially over the worst of your cramps, try intensifying your workouts with a light jog. Feel free to take it slow or give yourself a break if you feel any sort of .

Pilates moves work certain muscle groups, so you can modify your exercise routine to tailor your needs. If you’re feeling pain in your lower back during your period, try roll-downs to stretch out your back and spine.

These monthly ramps, muscle fatigue, and back pain can all potentially ruin your day, but a yoga class can help you feel better. By slowly stretch out those tired and sore muscles, you may feel less pain and discomfort Many yoga poses also help boost blood flow and circulation, which serves to avoid clotting.

Try not to do inversions, as some experts believe it could cause endometriosis. You may also perform such movements on an exercise ball to apply pressure to your abdomen for support. Specific poses like the restorative pose or the cat pose enable you to stretch your back muscles at a time where you may need it most. Take on a class with a gal pal or look up yoga sessions on Youtube to find the best poses to deal with your period symptoms.

Another good method of exercise while on your period is swimming. The low-impact sport is soothing, and you won’t have to worry about bleeding out if your flow is light due to the counter-pressure of the water.

If you don’t feel like going to the gym, you can always just do some simple stretches in the comfort of your own home. The main idea is to lengthen your muscles while also taking in deep breaths to relieve aches and cramps.

Lastly, if you’re feeling up for a little bit of cardio, signing yourself up for a Zumba or Kpop dance class is a perfect option. This type of workout will not only enhance your mood, but also give you a fun way to burn major calories!
As a female obgyn in Fort Lauderdale, Dr. Ghea is more than happy to cover any questions or concerns you may have when it comes to which workout routine is best for your period. She aims to make sure that you are comfortable and open with talking about the best ways to take care of your body. For more women’s health tips like these, go to Westside OB/GYN Group, a Plantation obgyn office, or call 954-473-2011 to set up an appointment.

Choosing the right OB/GYN to deliver your baby and provide prenatal care can be one of the most intimidating and toughest decisions for you to make. But there is no need to stress. Here are some of my best women’s health tips for picking the ideal OB/GYN for you.

Choosing an OB/GYN has to do with far more than just prenatal care.  You’ll also have to pay several types of visits, even when you’re not pregnant, for things like Pap smears, breast exams, discussing options for birth control, and other types of preventative care.  

Make sure your insurance plan covers preventative and prenatal care. If you need to locate a new provider, I recommend that you call your insurance provider and review your benefits, more specifically your prenatal benefits. Find out what areas of your care you’re responsible for. In particular, ask about tests such as genetic screening. Request a list of not only which doctors and hospitals are covered, but also which ones are considered in-network as your out of pocket costs may differ for in network and out of network covered providers. 

Once you know which doctors are covered on your insurance, your best option is to get a personal referral. Ask your family, friends, coworkers and primary care physician. A board-certified physician is a physician who has voluntarily committed to advance their knowledge base and stay up-to-date after wrapping up medical school and residency. This extra step shows that they keep up with the latest advancements in their specialty. You might want to schedule a preconception appointment so that you can meet the new doctor and confer your questions and preferences. This also gives you the opportunity to get a sense of how the two of you will get along. Go with your gut instinct. Sometimes you’ll just naturally click well with a new physician!

After you have found out which hospitals are covered by your insurance, it is important to be familiar with a few things about the hospital where you decide to deliver. While aesthetics and pretty Labor and Delivery Suites are nice, it is also crucial for you to know what level NICU your hospital provides just in case your baby needs those services. See what type of prenatal and lactation classes they offer.

With all the options that exist for birthing your baby, you and your designated obgyn should be completely committed to your birthing plan. If you come to a disagreement, there could be unnecessary tension. This is why getting the right person to deliver your baby is so imperative.

The  OB/GYN you seek out must have hospital privileges in your preferred hospital for delivery. If they do not, if an emergency were to arise, your obgyn won’t able to be there for the birth.

Save yourself some time by finding your OB/GYN’s availability on weekends and after hours. If you have any questions or concerns outside of normal business hours, it’s important that you know the best way to reach out to them during those hours, whether it’s through a phone call or patient portal.

If you’re looking for an OB/GYNs in the Fort Lauderdale Plantation area, Dr. Ghea is happy to take care of you. She will provide you with everything you may need with the utmost care you deserve. To make an appointment with her, stop by Westside OB/GYN group, a Plantation obgyn office, or call 954-473-2011.

Staying active during pregnancy is always a good move for you and your baby. Most women can typically get back into the groove of their usual pre-pregnancy exercise routine, and some even incorporate additional exercises like walking or swimming to stay fit during their pregnancy.

Exercise is essential throughout pregnancy to help prepare the body for labor. Studies have shown that women who are active throughout their pregnancy, including things like walking, swimming, and other light forms of movement into their daily routine, may have smoother deliveries, healthier babies, and take less time to recover.

It is also crucial that you nourish your body with a diet that is rich in nutrients along with your daily dose of vitamins and minerals that have been recommended by your doctor. If you work out on a regular basis, more nutrients may be needed during your pregnancy. The main goal should be to nourish your own body as well as your growing baby’s body. 

Exercising while pregnant provides loads of fantastic benefits for both mom (less duration in labor and quicker weight loss) and the baby (less colic and greater physical resilience). Not only that, but exercising is also prone to making most moms happier, less anxious, and ultimately more in touch with their bodies. It only makes sense for gestating mamas to want to commit to be fit as much as possible.

Exercise is proven to increase your mood, and can also amp up your energy levels. Focus that energy on exercises you enjoy (especially walking, swimming, stretching, pilates, or other mild activities). For an extra boost, try working out outside when possible. Spending time outside during pregnancy is good for you, so don’t be afraid to expose yourself to natural light and get that good old Vitamin D.

Here we’ll list some of the most commonly recommended workouts during pregnancy.

Walking helps to increase circulation and aligns the pelvis while also giving you a good way to be active at a level you can handle. Make an attempt to walk for a half hour to an hour a day.

Another great exercise for pregnant women is swimming. Besides the fact that it can help soothe the discomfort of baby aches, swimming also toughens stomach muscles, may help with the alignment of the pelvis, and is generally recommended to ensure the baby’s correct position for delivery. If you’re not the greatest swimmer, take it easy in the beginning. Make sure to warm up before starting your swim. Swimming is also great in the way that it leaves you feeling weightless, taking the burden of the baby’s weight off of you for a little bit.

Pelvic floor exercises, also known as Kegels, are advised to help extend the muscles between your legs that go from the pubic bone to your back. These are the muscles used to control the flow of urine.Your best bet is to squeeze these muscles 10-15 times in a row to build them up. Kegels can also relieve the sensitivity during sex and incontinence.

Lots of women are capable of squatting, lunging, and weightlifting during pregnancy, but it still wouldn’t hurt to get the okay from your obgyn before getting engaging in intense physical activities like these. These types of exercises can help with keeping your core strong during pregnancy while also improving muscle tone throughout delivery. Certain women should not partake in these workouts, especially those who have placenta problems, a history of muscle tightness, or other concerns, so it’s important to get your doctor’s approval first.

During your pregnancy, avoid all contact sports or any activity that includes the risk of falling. Make sure to stay away from just about anything that will put pressure on the joints and hips, hard yoga positions, or going for a jog without speaking with a doctor beforehand.

Although most exercises are deemed fine for pregnancy, countless women find themselves feeling limited by how they feel at different points in pregnancy and make an attempt to adjust regular workout routines to fit their fluctuating hormones and growing bellies.

Note that different forms of exercise are okay at different points of pregnancy. Lifting weights, laying on your back, and cardio are fine within the first trimester. Recognize what feels good for your body, and what does not. Cut yourself some slack if you need to take a break at any point. Lifting weights and doing cardio are still okay during the second trimester, but at that point you should hold off on any back work for the rest of your pregnancy.

Once you’ve reached the third trimester, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists encourages continuing with any well-tolerated forms of pregnancy exercises, perhaps just modifying the duration or intensity of the exercises. Walking can actually help get labor going! Staying active will help your physical and mental state, especially as the time of delivery is approaching. Once your baby is born, workouts are going to be difficult to fit in, and you want to try and take it easy as you spend time with your little miracle.

I do, however, encourage you to continue walking after delivery if you are able to (this will depend on the mode of delivery and if there were any complications). Remember, monitoring hydration and environmental temperature during any kind of exercise is very important to both your and your baby’s health.

With pregnancy, the trick is to work out in moderation. So make it your goal to exercise the right amount without pushing your limits.  If you are still unsure about what workout is best for your pregnancy, chat with Dr. Ghea, a female obgyn in Fort Lauderdale, and she will provide you with all the information and women’s health tips you need so that those nine months can be a fun, healthy, and comfortable experience for you. Appointments can be set up with her at Westside OB/GYN Group, a Plantation obgyn office, by calling 954-473-2011.

Getting the proper amount of sleep while you’re pregnant can be a bit of a struggle. You’ll find yourself exhausted from practically waddling around all day. When you finally have a moment to yourself to get some rest, you start to dread those all-night interruptions of your sleep. But don’t fret – here are some tips for sleeping better during pregnancy!

Within the first trimester, you’re going to be facing things like nausea, and late night potty breaks. Morning sickness tends to occur around 4 a.m. or just before hitting the sack. Try raising your upper body to keep blood pumping and circulating. It will give you a better chance of avoiding that unwanted nausea. Place a wedge pillow underneath your standard pillow to give yourself a gradual incline. 15 degrees should do the trick. It will also help with heartburn. Also, avoid eating a large meal before drifting off to catch some z’s. We also often recommend carbonated beverages, such as sparkling water or ginger ale, as these seem to help many women with nausea during pregnancy.

You can expect to feel the urge to pee around 2:30 in the morning, due to your growing uterus. Keep in mind how important it is to stay hydrated and drink plenty of water, especially throughout pregnancy. Make sure to cut out any carbonated beverages as well as anything that has aspartame (or NutraSweet), which can be found in low-calorie and sugar-free juices and sodas. They tend to perform as diuretics, which is the last thing you want or need. If you need to get out of bed, whatever you do, do not look at your blinding phone screen to see what time it is. It may end up keeping you up. See if you can buy a night-light for your bathroom to avoid being woken up by bright bulbs as they can strain your eyes and make it harder for you to go back to sleep.

During the second trimester, you’ll start feeling your baby’s movements. Most mommas say they start feeling the baby move its arms and legs for the first time at about 20 weeks. When you experience the case of the wiggles late at night, create a calming method you can initiate an hour before bed in an attempt to slow down the baby’s mo. Taking a brief stroll, for example, helps. Resist sweet or spicy foods past 4 p.m. to keep the potential kicking to a minimum.

If you happen to experience restless legs and your limbs feel fidgety, there could be a slight chance that you’re anemic or have an iron deficiency. Consult your obgyn to see if additional supplements are necessary to take along with your prenatal, whether it’s with extra iron or folate, and add vitamin C to help your body absorb it. Leg cramps are no fun, so if they start disturbing your slumber, see if you can include extra magnesium into your daily vitamin plan to help relieve the pain.

Once you’re in the third trimester, you’ve got a couple other things that could get in the way of your sleep. Worry, anxiety, aches, and pains, oh my! You may encounter some dreams that are a product of this worry and crippling anxiety. Books filled with baby advice can be overwhelming and make you think of every worst-case scenario, causing you unnecessary stress. If you have any concerns about the state of your pregnancy, take a class that demonstrates prenatal relaxation exercises or join a group with other soon-to-be mothers like yourself.

If that doesn’t keep your mind from racing, there’s no point in fighting it and getting flustered. Read a book that isn’t about pregnancy or heat up some tea to help give your body and mind a breather.

If your back, feet, and everything else aches and becomes too painful for you to be able to get enough sleep, try to lay on the left side of your body and place a pillow between your knees so that your hips align neutrally. This will reduce the weight applied on the vena cava, which is a blood vessel that can be crushed from your uterus pressing against it. If at that point you still can’t get comfortable, try applying some heat wherever you feel pain. Just remember to keep your tummy away from the warmth. With these steps, you should be “cruising for a snoozing!”

If you still have a hard time getting sufficient sleep for you and your baby, Dr. Ghea, a female obgyn in Fort Lauderdale, is happy to help. Her goal is to make women feel comfortable when talking about their bodies and expressing their health concerns. To schedule an appointment, call Westside OB/GYN Group at 954-473-2011 or come by the office in Plantation to meet with Dr. Ghea so she can answer all of your questions and recommend what’s best for you so that you can have a happy and healthy pregnancy!

Most women are aware of the strange cravings that occur once you’re pregnant. You know, things like pickles dipped in peanut butter or meat-cravings when you’ve been a vegetarian for years. It is extra important to pay attention to what you put in your body as the appropriate amount of nutrients, vitamins, and minerals will be good for the baby’s development. Maintaining a healthy, nutritious diet is imperative to you and your baby’s health. Doing so will also benefit you in the long run since it will be  much easier for you to lose the unwanted pregnancy weight that shows after giving birth.

It can be a struggle to figure out what exactly to eat when it’s for two, so we’ll narrow it down to the top 10 foods for pregnant moms to clear up any confusion or concerns you may have. Note that exposing your baby to healthy foods in the womb will raise the likelihood of them not only recognizing, but also embracing those flavors later on.

  1. Eggs

First and foremost, eggs are an excellent source of protein for your

pregnancy diet. The amino acids in the protein help the cells in both your body and

your baby’s. Eggs also have a good portion of vitamins and minerals that you need, one

of them being choline. Choline is great for the development of your baby’s brain and

spinal cord while also helping you avoid neural tube disadvantages. Add veggies and cheese to your eggs and you’re on your way to having yourself a yummy frittata. This is the perfect breakfast to start out your day in a healthy way!

  1. Salmon

If you’re a fan of seafood, the omega-3 fatty acids in salmon are essential for healthy development of your baby, and may even improve your mood. For the 8-12 ounces of seafood pregnant ladies are recommended to take in every week, cooked salmon is your best bet, especially because it is low in mercury.

  1. Beans

Beans are also another example of an ideal food to eat during pregnancy because they contain protein, iron, folic acid, potassium, magnesium and the fatty acids that are essential for pregnancy. They’re also rich in fiber and can help with preventing and alleviating pregnancy discomforts like constipation and hemorrhoids.

  1. Sweet Potatoes

Believe it or not, but the orange color on sweet potatoes comes from carotenoids and its plant pigments become vitamin A in our bodies. They also contain vitamin C, folic acid, and fiber.

  1. Walnuts

This may sound “nuts,” but walnuts are your best friend as they are rich in plant-based omega-3s.

They make a great quick snack and can also be tossed into a salad.

  1. Whole Grains

For fiber and nutrients with antioxidant vitamin E and mineral selenium, it’s ideal to include whole grains in your diet. They also are made up of phytonutrients, which are plant compounds that preserve cells. Depending on your taste buds, you can try different kinds from barley and oats to buckwheat and spelt. Whole grains can fit in with many meals, so don’t be afraid to be creative!

  1. Greek Yogurt

Dairy products are beneficial to your diet as well, especially Greek yogurt. It contains regular yogurt beat with twice the protein, and has plenty of probiotics and calcium. The calcium helps with the growth of your baby’s skeleton while also keeping your own bones strong. It can be included in breakfast or as a side to a wholesome meal.

  1. Fruits and Vegetables

You want your diet to be colorful, and fruits and veggies will do just the trick. You and your baby will get plenty of nutrients when you eat the rainbow — green, yellow, orange, purple, and red fruits and veggies offer lots of essential vitamins and minerals. An easy way to incorporate these would be with a salad. It could also go with just about any meal of your choice. The more colorful your plate is, the better.

  1. Lean meats

If you aren’t ready to sacrifice meat in your diet, don’t you worry! Meat can be a great source of protein just as long as you find cuts that are around 95-98% fat free. Beef and pork are the best options since they have choline. It should be noted, however, to avoid hot dogs and deli meats unless they are heated properly. There is a slight risk of infection from these foods if there is bacteria and parasites present, such as toxoplasma, listeria, and salmonella, which could be a potential hazard during pregnancy for you and your baby.

  1. Dark leafy greens

Last, but certainly not least, don’t forget to eat your greens — specifically spinach, Swiss chard, kale, and other dark leafy greens. These are prenatal superfoods with more than enough vitamins and nutrients such as vitamins A, C, and K, on top of folic acid. They go well in practically anything, like smoothies, omelets, soups, and stir-fries.

As a female obgyn in Fort Lauderdale, Dr. Ghea does everything in her power to help empower women and educate them about their bodies, whether it’s by simply giving crucial health care tips, or presenting them with healthy diet options when pregnant to prevent any issues. If you want to learn more about what foods are good for you and your baby, and would like to speak with a female obstetrician you can confide in, come by Westside OB/GYN Group, a Plantation obgyn office, or call 954-473-2011 to schedule an appointment.

As there are several treatment options for fibroids, it’s hard to pick out the best course of action.

There are plenty of women with uterine fibroids that don’t come across any signs or symptoms, or experience moderately irritating but bearable signs and symptoms. Treatment for fibroids may vary between no treatment whatsoever to surgery. Unless fibroids are causing excessive bleeding, discomfort, or bladder issues, treatment for the most part isn’t necessary.

The good news is that not all fibroids expand. Even those bigger in size may not lead to any symptoms, and most become smaller after menopause.

You should still keep track of its size if you happen to face any pain or bleeding. Try to make a habit of receiving pelvic exams every year just to be safe.

Although you can’t get rid of fibroids on your own, there are still things to help with the pain or discomfort you may be feeling. Once fibroids develop on the outside of the uterus, you may notice a lump on your tummy. You can lie down and place a hot pack or water bottle on your lower midsection to alleviate the pain. You’d have to be consistent with it numerous times a day. You can also take pain relievers, like ibuprofen.

Other options include:

Hormone Therapy

To keep the fibroid from growing, your obgyn may advise that you stop taking birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy. In other cases, however, they may prescribe birth control pills to help limit the bleeding and anemia from fibroids, even though the hormones can make fibroids grow.

GnRH Agonists

GnRH is a hormone your body naturally produces. An agonist medicine counteracts that hormone, and your obstetrician may prescribe one to shrink fibroids and reduce anemia. These drugs don’t come cheap. You shouldn’t take them for more than 6 months because they can increase the likelihood of you getting osteoporosis, which weakens your bones. Your doctor may also prescribe a small dose of progestin, another hormone, to make osteoporosis less possible. When you stop taking a GnRH agonist, the likeliness of your fibroids growing back exists.

There are a few alternatives that you might want to think about.

Fibroid embolization can shrink a fibroid. Your doctor would be injecting polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) into the arteries, which ends up feeding the fibroid. The PVA cuts off the blood supply to the fibroid, causing it to shrink. It’s not surgery, but you might have to spend a couple of nights in the hospital because you could face nausea, vomiting, and pain within the first set of days afterward.

Endometrial ablation is a procedure where doctors break apart the lining of the uterus to reduce the flow of the bleeding connected to tiny fibroids.

Myomectomy is a surgery to weed out fibroids. If you plan to become pregnant, your obgyn may highly suggest this option overs. Keep in mind that scarring can happen, when the last thing you want is to end up infertile. You’d have to be patient and wait 4-6 months after surgery before you attempt to conceive. In the vast majority of women, symptoms tend to go away following a myomectomy. But in others, the fibroids return. Whether it works has to do with how many fibroids you have and whether the surgeon is able to clear them all out. A myomectomy may be abdominal surgery, or your surgeon may use a hysteroscope or laparoscope to take out the fibroids without having to make a large cut on your stomach. There is also an experimental system that uses MRI-guided ultrasound energy to find the fibroids and diminish or destroy them.

Hysterectomy is surgery that removes the uterus. Many women don’t require such drastic treatment. Note that you won’t be able to get pregnant after this operation.

As a female obgyn in Fort Lauderdale, Dr. Ghea is able to offer assistance along with treatment to her patients who experience uterine fibroids. She always looks to ensure her patients’ comfort whenever they visit her office. For those looking for a Plantation obgyn group, feel free to make an appointment with Dr. Ghea at Westside OB/GYN Group by calling 954-473-2011 or filling out an online request.