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Category Archives: Health Tips

If you’re trying to have a baby, being healthy before, during and after pregnancy encompasses so many different aspects of your life. A healthy momma-to-be and a healthy pregnancy go hand-in-hand. Here are some tips for having a healthy pregnancy that can come in handy when you’re expecting.

Early Prenatal Care

Make sure to find a good OBGYN and determine a place where you plan to deliver. during the early stages of your pregnancy so that you get the prenatal care that you need. It’s always best to plan the necessary ultrasound scans and tests ahead of time, so that you’re not only aware of them, but also well-prepared.

Eat Wholesome and Nutritious Food

Your body feeds off of energy. Eating whole grains, fresh fruits and veggies, eggs, organic meats and dairy products will give you and your baby the right amount of nutrients. These foods are made up of minerals, vitamins, essential fatty acids, amino acids and other essential nutrients. Although you need food to keep you going, you also need to watch what you eat. By all means, avoid junk food!

Drink Plenty of Water

Staying hydrated helps with regulating your amniotic fluid levels. Try and make it your daily goal to drink at least 10 glasses of water. Dehydration can lead to morning sickness, drowsiness, and cramps, as well as contractions during the second and third trimesters. Drinking water also helps prevent constipation, hemorrhoids, UTIs, fatigue, headaches, swelling, and other uncomfortable pregnancy symptoms.

Take Prenatal Vitamins

During the time when you are trying to conceive, it’s wise to start taking prenatal vitamins. Your baby’s neural cord, which becomes the brain and spinal cord, develops during the first month of pregnancy It’s important you get nutrients such as folic acid, calcium, and iron from the very beginning.

Exercise Regularly

Your body is going to go through many changes. One of the most prominent changes is your shape and weight. Fitting regular exercise into your schedule will help you stay healthy and flexible. Exercise helps to cope with stress and goes a long way in helping you in terms of labor and motherhood.

Staying active is important for your overall well-being and can help you control your weight, improve circulation, enhance your mood, and get better sleep.

Pilates, yoga, swimming, and walking are also great activities for most pregnant women, but be sure to check with your OBGYN beforehand. Try and devote 30 minutes of exercise most days of the week. Listen to your body, though, and don’t push your limit.

Get Some Rest

Getting enough sleep is important during pregnancy. Try and get as much sleep as you can, and rest your feet as much as possible. Some yoga and deep breathing can also help you relax and stay calm. You may feel like you’re busy now, but the moment the baby comes, you’ll have even less time for yourself. 

Avoid Alcohol, Drugs and Smoking

Avoid alcohol because it reaches your baby through the blood and can cause birth defects. Drugs and smoking are also equally as dangerous because of their effect on the baby’s growth and health. Smoking cigarettes decreases oxygen flow to your baby and is associated with preterm birth and other complications. 

Reduce Caffeine and Recharge with Fruits

It’s much healthier for you to recharge yourself with fruit instead of caffeine. Caffeine has been known to increase the chances of miscarriage. Pregnant women are low on iron, and caffeine makes it more challenging for your body to absorb iron. Most doctors advise limiting caffeine throughout pregnancy. If you’re used to your morning java, replace that urge with a quick pick-me-up by nibbling on some fruit. 

Be environmentally aware

If you’re exposed to toxic chemicals, pesticides, radioactive elements, lead, or mercury at your workplace or home on the regular, you should reach out to your OBGYN for advice since these are hazardous to you and your baby.

See Your Dentist

See your dentist before you get pregnant and brush your teeth daily. Hormonal changes during pregnancy causes weaker gums. An increase in estrogen and progesterone levels can cause bleeding and tender gums. So, oral care is especially crucial throughout pregnancy.

Watch Your Emotional Health

Due to hormonal shifts during pregnancy, you’ll probably go through occasional mood swings and emotional ups and downs. If you think you’re depressed and it’s affecting you, don’t be afraid to ask for help to try and bounce back to normalcy.

Strengthening Pelvic Floor Muscles

Kegels strengthen the pelvic floor muscles that support your bladder, bowels, and uterus. If done properly, these simple exercises can help promise a smoother delivery and prevent future problems with incontinence. The best part about it is that nobody can tell you’re doing them, so if you wanted to, you could practice kegels whether you’re sitting in the car or standing in line at the grocery store. All you have to do is practice squeezing as if you’re stopping the flow of urine when you use the bathroom, hold it for three seconds, then relax for three, and then repeat this 10 times.

Track Your Weight Gain

A steady increase in your weight indicates your baby’s growth. Keeping track of your weight is important to ensure that you’re on the right track. Normal weight gain during pregnancy is 25 to 35 pounds, if you are at a normal weight at the beginning of your pregnancy. Your doctor’s recommendations will vary if you are above or below a normal BMI.

Dress comfy

Go ahead and get yourself comfortable clothes. As your weight and shape will be changing rapidly, putting on tight clothing could be very uncomfortable and in some cases, even dangerous for you and your baby..

Wear Appropriate Footwear

As your pregnancy progresses, your weight gain shifts the center of gravity and applies a painful pressure on your feet. So, it’s beneficial to wear comfy, nonrestrictive shoes when you’re pregnant. Many expectant moms find they need a bigger shoe size even after they’ve given birth, so go a step up if you have to.

Take Care of Your Skin

Pregnancy makes your skin more sensitive to sunlight, so you’re more prone to sunburn and chloasma, those dark, blotchy spots that sometimes show up on the face. Remember to apply sunscreen, wear a hat, and put on your favorite pair of shades before heading outdoors!

Pamper Yourself

Although you have to watch what you eat, listen to your body and give in to the cravings that pop up sometimes. Treat yourself with a lunch out, a manicure, a much-needed day out with your friends, or by going out for a quiet stroll. These activities relieve both you and the baby.

Educate Yourself

Even if this isn’t your first rodeo, going to a childbirth class will make you feel more prepared for delivery. Not only will you have the opportunity to learn more about childbirth and infant care, but you can ask questions and voice any concerns.

Now is also the time to review your family’s medical history. Go over things with your obgyn including issues with past pregnancies, and inform them about any family tendencies of birth defects. 

Stress Management

Pregnancy-related lifestyle changes and hormonal changes can be stressful. Life during pregnancy is a rollercoaster ride and may be overwhelming. So, finding ways to control stress is important. You can manage stress by changing the way you respond to situations at home or at work. Meditation, yoga, and doing arts and crafts can help to de-stress.

Talk to Your Baby

Talking to your baby can be a remarkable and soul-soothing exercise. It helps you establish the bond and communicate with your little one. You can tell your baby how you feel about your family, the food you eat and activities that you enjoy. You could also sing and read to your baby!
If you’re looking to speak with an obstetrician in Fort Lauderdale for more pregnancy care tips or general women’s health tips, give Dr. Ghea, a top female obgyn in Fort Lauderdale, a call at 954-473-2011 to set up an appointment at Westside OB/GYN Group.

If you’ve ever gotten a Pap smear, it’s equally important to get familiar with the lowdown on Colposcopy. But to do so, you must first understand what it actually means.

So, what exactly is a Colposcopy anyway?

Well, for starters, a colposcopy is a procedure to closely examine your cervix, vagina and vulva. The doctor may at this time also perform a biopsy, which is used in attempts to help diagnose cervical cancer.

While a Pap smear helps your OBGYN look out for any cell changes on the cervix, a colposcopy inspects those abnormal cells with the use of a microscope and bright light. The colposcope, which is a decently-sized microscope, does not get inserted into the vagina, but magnifies the cervix to have a better view of any sort of changes. It’s essentially a slightly more intricate version of a Pap smear.

Though this information may seem a bit on the scary side, there’s no need to freak out or be on the fence about it. The procedure isn’t something to be afraid of – in fact, it is very similar to the process of a pelvic exam. You’ll lay down with your legs in stirrups while your OBGYN inserts the speculum. The colposcope is positioned 8 to 10 inches from the vagina with a bright light. Your provider will use a vinegar solution or something of that nature to help highlight any abnormal areas and tissues.

Colposcopies are usually suggested by your OBGYN if your Pap smear shows any abnormal cervical cells. There are 2 types of biopsies: the one that removes tissue from outside your cervix, and the other that takes tissue from inside the opening of your cervix. Sometimes you are required to have more than one biopsy.

Try not to schedule your examination while you are menstruating. For at least 24 hours before the examination, you shouldn’t do any form of douching, or use tampons along with any other products that enter the vagina, have sex, or use any vaginal medications.

Some might suggest taking a pain reliever like acetaminophen or ibuprofen just before your colposcopy appointment. You want to be as comfortable and relaxed as possible, while avoiding any chances of slight pain or discomfort.

If abnormal tissue is found, small pieces of tissue can be removed from your vagina and/or cervix thanks to the use of biopsy instruments. 

Your OBGYN might apply a solution to the area of the biopsy to decrease bleeding.

A colposcopy normally doesn’t cause any more discomfort than an average Pap smear. Some women, however, tend to feel a sting from the acetic acid solution used for the procedure.

Cervical biopsies can cause some issues like a slight pinch from when each tissue gets removed, discomfort, cramping, and pain, that can last for up to 1 to 2 days, or even slight vaginal bleeding and a coffee-colored vaginal discharge that could last up to a week.

There’s no recovery time unless you go through a biopsy. You can go about your daily activities once it’s over with.

In the case that you do end up having a biopsy during your colposcopy, you might need to limit your activity to allow your cervix to heal.

Reach out to your OBGYN if you feel any heavy vaginal bleeding, severe pain in the lower abdomen, or a fever or chills following after your examination.

Remember how important it is to get regular Pap smears as it’s always better to be safe than sorry! If you are looking for a female obgyn in Fort Lauderdale who you can feel comfortable with,, Dr. Ghea is the one for you to call! She is more than happy to take care of you while also providing you with all the women’s health tips you may need. Book an appointment with her today at Westside OB/GYN Group, a Plantation obgyn office, by calling 954-473-2011.

Endometriosis, sometimes referred to as “endo,” is a common health issue among women. Its name comes from the word endometrium, the tissue that usually lines the uterus or womb. Endometriosis occurs when tissue matching the uterine lining (the lining of the womb) spreads outside of your uterus and on other parts in your body where it doesn’t belong. Endometriosis is typically found in the lower abdomen or pelvis, but can develop anywhere in the body. 

In many instances, endometriosis can turn up on your ovaries, fallopian tubes, tissues that keep the uterus in position, and the outermost surface of the uterus. Other areas for growths may include the vagina, cervix, vulva, bowel, bladder, or rectum. It is rare for endometriosis to show up in other sections of the body, such as the lungs, brain, and skin.

Women with endometriosis more often than not experience lower abdominal pain, pain with periods,pain during or after sex, digestive problems, pain with urination, and may even struggle with infertility. However, some women with endometriosis may not face any symptoms whatsoever.

It’s important that you speak with your obgyn if you start to notice or feel any of these symptoms.

No one knows the exact cause of this disease, but there are several theories. A few possible explanations would be:

  • Issues with menstrual period flow. Retrograde menstrual flow is the most probable cause of endometriosis. Some of the tissue dispersed throughout your period flows through the fallopian tube into other areas of the body, like the pelvis.
  • Genetics. Because endometriosis can sometimes be hereditary, it may be passed down in your genes.
  • Immune system. A bad immune system may fail to detect and wipe out endometrial tissue growing outside of the uterus. Immune system disorders and ovarian cancer are more common in women with endometriosis.
  • Hormones. The hormone estrogen seems to boost endometriosis.
  • Surgery. When you undergo a surgery in the abdominal area, such as a C-section or hysterectomy, endometrial tissue could be picked up and moved. For example, endometrial tissue has been spotted in abdominal scars.

The major drawback of endometriosis is impaired fertility. About one-third to one-half of women with endometriosis have a hard time getting pregnant.

Infertility can happen from endometriosis creating adherences that entrap the egg close to the ovary, making it challenging for it to properly travel down the fallopian tube to be fertilized by sperm.

But don’t let this scare you! According to the Mayo Clinic, plenty of women with mild to moderate endometriosis are still able to get pregnant – it just might take more time, so be patient with your body!

There are a couple of factors that determine a woman’s treatment, including age, the severity of her symptoms, and whether the patient wants to become pregnant. Be sure to discuss your treatment options with your OB/GYN.

If you’re not looking to get pregnant, hormonal birth control is normally the first step in treatment. This may consist of:

  • Extended-cycle (you only get a few periods a year) or continuous cycle (you don’t get periods) birth control. These types of hormonal contraceptives are offered in the form of a pill or a shot and help stop bleeding and diminish or get rid of pain.
  • IUD to help minimize pain and bleeding. The hormonal IUD prevents pregnancy for up to seven years (how many years may vary based on which brand you choose). But the hormonal IUD might not take care of your pain and bleeding due to endometriosis for that long.

Hormonal treatment functions only as long as it’s taken and is suited for women who don’t experience severe pain or symptoms.

If you are attempting to get pregnant, your obgyn might prescribe a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist. This medicine keeps the body from developing the hormones responsible for ovulation and the growth of endometriosis. This treatment triggers a temporary menopause, but it also helps regulate the spread of endometriosis. Once you stop taking the medicine, you’ll start getting your period again, but you may have a better shot at getting pregnant.

Surgery is mainly an option for severe symptoms, when hormones aren’t doing the trick or if you’re dealing with fertility complications. During the operation, the surgeon can track down any areas of endometriosis and can take out the endometriosis patches. Following surgery, hormone treatment is commonly restarted unless you’re trying to get pregnant.

Alternative treatments you can try, by yourself or with any of the treatments previously mentioned, involve:

  • Pain medicine. For mild symptoms, your OB/GYN may recommend taking over-the-counter medicines for pain, such as ibuprofen (Advil and Motrin) or naproxen (Aleve).
  • Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies. Some women find alleviation from pain thanks to therapies like acupuncture, chiropractic care, herbs like cinnamon twig or licorice root, or supplements, such as thiamine (vitamin B1), magnesium, or omega-3 fatty acids.

If you come across symptoms of endometriosis, you’re more than welcome to sit down and chat with Dr. Ghea, a female obgyn in Fort Lauderdale. Once you speak with her, she’ll figure out the best method to diagnose and treat it based on what you’re going through and happily walk you through the process, whether it’s to help you get pregnant, or just to feel better. To schedule an appointment, give her a call at 954-473-2011, or stop by her Plantation obgyn office at Westside OB/GYN Group.

Let’s face it — talking about certain topics can sometimes make us feel uncomfortable. As kids, many of us were taught that discussing bathroom habits and sexual issues was not acceptable or taboo. It only makes sense then, as grown women, that we generally shy away from bringing up topics related to bladder and bowel control, sexual discomfort, and pain “down there”, which all happen to be symptoms of pelvic floor disorders.

More often than not, women experience symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction, such as pelvic pain, bladder pain, urinary leaks, constipation and pain during sex for six years before pursuing medical help. At times, the muscular pelvic system isn’t quite necessarily the source of the pain, but the muscles are almost always involved in some sort of way.

There are very distinct causes for pelvic pain that lead to very different treatment plans, and these are plans that only a professional can help guide.

Luckily, more healthcare providers are endorsing pelvic floor physical therapy before, or as an alternative to, surgery.

Women who are experiencing any type of pain during sex or pelvic pain in general are encouraged to look into physical therapy as a treatment option. If you’re thinking about seeking pelvic floor therapy, here are some things you should know to be prepared.

For starters, despite popular belief, it’s not solely for new moms. Sturdier, more synchronized pelvic floor muscles are an advantage to everyone, so new mothers aren’t the only ones who benefit from pelvic floor physical therapy.

Another thing to know is how it’s not as invasive as one might believe.

Anything mentioning the term “pelvic” sounds clinical and can make some people automatically picture hospital gowns and feet-in stirrups. The visit will begin by asking questions about your symptoms focusing on those that are most bothersome to you. Your physical therapist should ask for a good amount of information There are certain important factors to address like water intake, how frequently you pee, bowel habits, sexual pain, and taking a look at your back and range of motion. That gives patients a chance to get comfortable with their PT.

Note that pelvic floor rehabilitation is not all about Kegels. Kegels involve contracting and relaxing your pelvic floor muscles, which keeps your uterus and bladder in place above your vagina. The idea is to identify the right muscles to contract and relax. One method is to attempt to stop your stream of pee while you’re peeing. If you are able to do this, you’ve got the basic move figured out. (But don’t start and pause your stream on a regular basis, as that may do harm.)

You also might have to re-learn how to do pelvic floor contractions, or if not at the very least learn how to loosen up overly tight pelvic muscles. More contractions aren’t always the best for you, though. Constantly putting tension on your pelvic floor muscles is almost like perpetually having your shoulders stuck in a shrug. It truly has to do with learning to work your pelvic floor muscles the proper way.

“Urine” trouble” if you can’t figure out what else pelvic floor therapy helps with. Believe it or not, it can help you poop!

It can help with toilet troubles; as bowel dysfunction and constipation are progressively prevalent and a cause of sexual pain and urinary leaks. This is because of toilets being created on higher levels to favor an aging population when we’re supposed to be able to perform “when nature calls” in a squatting position.

It has all to do with strength, and nothing to do with weakness. PT is about understanding how to coordinate pelvic floor muscles so they can stimulate at the right time and relax at other times.

Pelvic pain has become the norm for too many people, but that doesn’t mean you should let it be yours. Fixing your floor is worthwhile, and also helps with menopause symptoms. Because it’s such an intimate relationship, it’s critical that you feel secure with your PT since you’re physically and mentally putting yourself in an extremely vulnerable position. The best way to get over that initial discomfort is to find someone who makes you feel relaxed the moment you step into their room.

If you are looking for treatment advice for pelvic floor rehabilitation as well as other women’s health tips, go ahead and book an appointment with Dr. Ghea, a female obgyn in Fort Lauderdale, by calling 954-473-2011, or visiting Westside OB/GYN Group, a Plantation obgyn office. She is more than willing to help assist you while making sure you are at ease!

It’s that time of the month again, which means all you’re going to want to do is stay under your covers as you desperately wait for the cramps, bloating, and crabbiness to come to an end so you get to feel normal again. The fatigue that you experience when you get your period sometimes makes it hard to find the motivation to do any physical activity.However, having an exercise routine during your menstrual cycle can actually help lessen the symptoms, alleviating the pain that you’re used to feeling. The right workout will allow you to cope with your typical symptoms so you don’t have to allow mother nature to get in the way of your daily life.

The best thing to do while exercising during your period is to pay attention to your body. Staying hydrated and drinking a good amount of water is always necessary when you’re exercising, but it’s especially important throughout your period. If the cramping and bloating is too heavy for you to be out and about, give yourself a freebie from the sweat sesh. But if you’re in the mood to get moving, here are seven recommended workouts that you can do.

Walking is great low-intensity cardio. Go ahead and grab your favorite pair of sneakers and go for a stroll, whether it’s around your neighborhood or through a trail in the park. Though it may not be the most intense method of exercise, you can still keep track of your steps, and burn calories by walking. 

If you’re officially over the worst of your cramps, try intensifying your workouts with a light jog. Feel free to take it slow or give yourself a break if you feel any sort of .

Pilates moves work certain muscle groups, so you can modify your exercise routine to tailor your needs. If you’re feeling pain in your lower back during your period, try roll-downs to stretch out your back and spine.

These monthly ramps, muscle fatigue, and back pain can all potentially ruin your day, but a yoga class can help you feel better. By slowly stretch out those tired and sore muscles, you may feel less pain and discomfort Many yoga poses also help boost blood flow and circulation, which serves to avoid clotting.

Try not to do inversions, as some experts believe it could cause endometriosis. You may also perform such movements on an exercise ball to apply pressure to your abdomen for support. Specific poses like the restorative pose or the cat pose enable you to stretch your back muscles at a time where you may need it most. Take on a class with a gal pal or look up yoga sessions on Youtube to find the best poses to deal with your period symptoms.

Another good method of exercise while on your period is swimming. The low-impact sport is soothing, and you won’t have to worry about bleeding out if your flow is light due to the counter-pressure of the water.

If you don’t feel like going to the gym, you can always just do some simple stretches in the comfort of your own home. The main idea is to lengthen your muscles while also taking in deep breaths to relieve aches and cramps.

Lastly, if you’re feeling up for a little bit of cardio, signing yourself up for a Zumba or Kpop dance class is a perfect option. This type of workout will not only enhance your mood, but also give you a fun way to burn major calories!
As a female obgyn in Fort Lauderdale, Dr. Ghea is more than happy to cover any questions or concerns you may have when it comes to which workout routine is best for your period. She aims to make sure that you are comfortable and open with talking about the best ways to take care of your body. For more women’s health tips like these, go to Westside OB/GYN Group, a Plantation obgyn office, or call 954-473-2011 to set up an appointment.

Choosing the right OB/GYN to deliver your baby and provide prenatal care can be one of the most intimidating and toughest decisions for you to make. But there is no need to stress. Here are some of my best women’s health tips for picking the ideal OB/GYN for you.

Choosing an OB/GYN has to do with far more than just prenatal care.  You’ll also have to pay several types of visits, even when you’re not pregnant, for things like Pap smears, breast exams, discussing options for birth control, and other types of preventative care.  

Make sure your insurance plan covers preventative and prenatal care. If you need to locate a new provider, I recommend that you call your insurance provider and review your benefits, more specifically your prenatal benefits. Find out what areas of your care you’re responsible for. In particular, ask about tests such as genetic screening. Request a list of not only which doctors and hospitals are covered, but also which ones are considered in-network as your out of pocket costs may differ for in network and out of network covered providers. 

Once you know which doctors are covered on your insurance, your best option is to get a personal referral. Ask your family, friends, coworkers and primary care physician. A board-certified physician is a physician who has voluntarily committed to advance their knowledge base and stay up-to-date after wrapping up medical school and residency. This extra step shows that they keep up with the latest advancements in their specialty. You might want to schedule a preconception appointment so that you can meet the new doctor and confer your questions and preferences. This also gives you the opportunity to get a sense of how the two of you will get along. Go with your gut instinct. Sometimes you’ll just naturally click well with a new physician!

After you have found out which hospitals are covered by your insurance, it is important to be familiar with a few things about the hospital where you decide to deliver. While aesthetics and pretty Labor and Delivery Suites are nice, it is also crucial for you to know what level NICU your hospital provides just in case your baby needs those services. See what type of prenatal and lactation classes they offer.

With all the options that exist for birthing your baby, you and your designated obgyn should be completely committed to your birthing plan. If you come to a disagreement, there could be unnecessary tension. This is why getting the right person to deliver your baby is so imperative.

The  OB/GYN you seek out must have hospital privileges in your preferred hospital for delivery. If they do not, if an emergency were to arise, your obgyn won’t able to be there for the birth.

Save yourself some time by finding your OB/GYN’s availability on weekends and after hours. If you have any questions or concerns outside of normal business hours, it’s important that you know the best way to reach out to them during those hours, whether it’s through a phone call or patient portal.

If you’re looking for an OB/GYNs in the Fort Lauderdale Plantation area, Dr. Ghea is happy to take care of you. She will provide you with everything you may need with the utmost care you deserve. To make an appointment with her, stop by Westside OB/GYN group, a Plantation obgyn office, or call 954-473-2011.

Staying active during pregnancy is always a good move for you and your baby. Most women can typically get back into the groove of their usual pre-pregnancy exercise routine, and some even incorporate additional exercises like walking or swimming to stay fit during their pregnancy.

Exercise is essential throughout pregnancy to help prepare the body for labor. Studies have shown that women who are active throughout their pregnancy, including things like walking, swimming, and other light forms of movement into their daily routine, may have smoother deliveries, healthier babies, and take less time to recover.

It is also crucial that you nourish your body with a diet that is rich in nutrients along with your daily dose of vitamins and minerals that have been recommended by your doctor. If you work out on a regular basis, more nutrients may be needed during your pregnancy. The main goal should be to nourish your own body as well as your growing baby’s body. 

Exercising while pregnant provides loads of fantastic benefits for both mom (less duration in labor and quicker weight loss) and the baby (less colic and greater physical resilience). Not only that, but exercising is also prone to making most moms happier, less anxious, and ultimately more in touch with their bodies. It only makes sense for gestating mamas to want to commit to be fit as much as possible.

Exercise is proven to increase your mood, and can also amp up your energy levels. Focus that energy on exercises you enjoy (especially walking, swimming, stretching, pilates, or other mild activities). For an extra boost, try working out outside when possible. Spending time outside during pregnancy is good for you, so don’t be afraid to expose yourself to natural light and get that good old Vitamin D.

Here we’ll list some of the most commonly recommended workouts during pregnancy.

Walking helps to increase circulation and aligns the pelvis while also giving you a good way to be active at a level you can handle. Make an attempt to walk for a half hour to an hour a day.

Another great exercise for pregnant women is swimming. Besides the fact that it can help soothe the discomfort of baby aches, swimming also toughens stomach muscles, may help with the alignment of the pelvis, and is generally recommended to ensure the baby’s correct position for delivery. If you’re not the greatest swimmer, take it easy in the beginning. Make sure to warm up before starting your swim. Swimming is also great in the way that it leaves you feeling weightless, taking the burden of the baby’s weight off of you for a little bit.

Pelvic floor exercises, also known as Kegels, are advised to help extend the muscles between your legs that go from the pubic bone to your back. These are the muscles used to control the flow of urine.Your best bet is to squeeze these muscles 10-15 times in a row to build them up. Kegels can also relieve the sensitivity during sex and incontinence.

Lots of women are capable of squatting, lunging, and weightlifting during pregnancy, but it still wouldn’t hurt to get the okay from your obgyn before getting engaging in intense physical activities like these. These types of exercises can help with keeping your core strong during pregnancy while also improving muscle tone throughout delivery. Certain women should not partake in these workouts, especially those who have placenta problems, a history of muscle tightness, or other concerns, so it’s important to get your doctor’s approval first.

During your pregnancy, avoid all contact sports or any activity that includes the risk of falling. Make sure to stay away from just about anything that will put pressure on the joints and hips, hard yoga positions, or going for a jog without speaking with a doctor beforehand.

Although most exercises are deemed fine for pregnancy, countless women find themselves feeling limited by how they feel at different points in pregnancy and make an attempt to adjust regular workout routines to fit their fluctuating hormones and growing bellies.

Note that different forms of exercise are okay at different points of pregnancy. Lifting weights, laying on your back, and cardio are fine within the first trimester. Recognize what feels good for your body, and what does not. Cut yourself some slack if you need to take a break at any point. Lifting weights and doing cardio are still okay during the second trimester, but at that point you should hold off on any back work for the rest of your pregnancy.

Once you’ve reached the third trimester, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists encourages continuing with any well-tolerated forms of pregnancy exercises, perhaps just modifying the duration or intensity of the exercises. Walking can actually help get labor going! Staying active will help your physical and mental state, especially as the time of delivery is approaching. Once your baby is born, workouts are going to be difficult to fit in, and you want to try and take it easy as you spend time with your little miracle.

I do, however, encourage you to continue walking after delivery if you are able to (this will depend on the mode of delivery and if there were any complications). Remember, monitoring hydration and environmental temperature during any kind of exercise is very important to both your and your baby’s health.

With pregnancy, the trick is to work out in moderation. So make it your goal to exercise the right amount without pushing your limits.  If you are still unsure about what workout is best for your pregnancy, chat with Dr. Ghea, a female obgyn in Fort Lauderdale, and she will provide you with all the information and women’s health tips you need so that those nine months can be a fun, healthy, and comfortable experience for you. Appointments can be set up with her at Westside OB/GYN Group, a Plantation obgyn office, by calling 954-473-2011.

Most women are aware of the strange cravings that occur once you’re pregnant. You know, things like pickles dipped in peanut butter or meat-cravings when you’ve been a vegetarian for years. It is extra important to pay attention to what you put in your body as the appropriate amount of nutrients, vitamins, and minerals will be good for the baby’s development. Maintaining a healthy, nutritious diet is imperative to you and your baby’s health. Doing so will also benefit you in the long run since it will be  much easier for you to lose the unwanted pregnancy weight that shows after giving birth.

It can be a struggle to figure out what exactly to eat when it’s for two, so we’ll narrow it down to the top 10 foods for pregnant moms to clear up any confusion or concerns you may have. Note that exposing your baby to healthy foods in the womb will raise the likelihood of them not only recognizing, but also embracing those flavors later on.

  1. Eggs

First and foremost, eggs are an excellent source of protein for your

pregnancy diet. The amino acids in the protein help the cells in both your body and

your baby’s. Eggs also have a good portion of vitamins and minerals that you need, one

of them being choline. Choline is great for the development of your baby’s brain and

spinal cord while also helping you avoid neural tube disadvantages. Add veggies and cheese to your eggs and you’re on your way to having yourself a yummy frittata. This is the perfect breakfast to start out your day in a healthy way!

  1. Salmon

If you’re a fan of seafood, the omega-3 fatty acids in salmon are essential for healthy development of your baby, and may even improve your mood. For the 8-12 ounces of seafood pregnant ladies are recommended to take in every week, cooked salmon is your best bet, especially because it is low in mercury.

  1. Beans

Beans are also another example of an ideal food to eat during pregnancy because they contain protein, iron, folic acid, potassium, magnesium and the fatty acids that are essential for pregnancy. They’re also rich in fiber and can help with preventing and alleviating pregnancy discomforts like constipation and hemorrhoids.

  1. Sweet Potatoes

Believe it or not, but the orange color on sweet potatoes comes from carotenoids and its plant pigments become vitamin A in our bodies. They also contain vitamin C, folic acid, and fiber.

  1. Walnuts

This may sound “nuts,” but walnuts are your best friend as they are rich in plant-based omega-3s.

They make a great quick snack and can also be tossed into a salad.

  1. Whole Grains

For fiber and nutrients with antioxidant vitamin E and mineral selenium, it’s ideal to include whole grains in your diet. They also are made up of phytonutrients, which are plant compounds that preserve cells. Depending on your taste buds, you can try different kinds from barley and oats to buckwheat and spelt. Whole grains can fit in with many meals, so don’t be afraid to be creative!

  1. Greek Yogurt

Dairy products are beneficial to your diet as well, especially Greek yogurt. It contains regular yogurt beat with twice the protein, and has plenty of probiotics and calcium. The calcium helps with the growth of your baby’s skeleton while also keeping your own bones strong. It can be included in breakfast or as a side to a wholesome meal.

  1. Fruits and Vegetables

You want your diet to be colorful, and fruits and veggies will do just the trick. You and your baby will get plenty of nutrients when you eat the rainbow — green, yellow, orange, purple, and red fruits and veggies offer lots of essential vitamins and minerals. An easy way to incorporate these would be with a salad. It could also go with just about any meal of your choice. The more colorful your plate is, the better.

  1. Lean meats

If you aren’t ready to sacrifice meat in your diet, don’t you worry! Meat can be a great source of protein just as long as you find cuts that are around 95-98% fat free. Beef and pork are the best options since they have choline. It should be noted, however, to avoid hot dogs and deli meats unless they are heated properly. There is a slight risk of infection from these foods if there is bacteria and parasites present, such as toxoplasma, listeria, and salmonella, which could be a potential hazard during pregnancy for you and your baby.

  1. Dark leafy greens

Last, but certainly not least, don’t forget to eat your greens — specifically spinach, Swiss chard, kale, and other dark leafy greens. These are prenatal superfoods with more than enough vitamins and nutrients such as vitamins A, C, and K, on top of folic acid. They go well in practically anything, like smoothies, omelets, soups, and stir-fries.

As a female obgyn in Fort Lauderdale, Dr. Ghea does everything in her power to help empower women and educate them about their bodies, whether it’s by simply giving crucial health care tips, or presenting them with healthy diet options when pregnant to prevent any issues. If you want to learn more about what foods are good for you and your baby, and would like to speak with a female obstetrician you can confide in, come by Westside OB/GYN Group, a Plantation obgyn office, or call 954-473-2011 to schedule an appointment.

As there are several treatment options for fibroids, it’s hard to pick out the best course of action.

There are plenty of women with uterine fibroids that don’t come across any signs or symptoms, or experience moderately irritating but bearable signs and symptoms. Treatment for fibroids may vary between no treatment whatsoever to surgery. Unless fibroids are causing excessive bleeding, discomfort, or bladder issues, treatment for the most part isn’t necessary.

The good news is that not all fibroids expand. Even those bigger in size may not lead to any symptoms, and most become smaller after menopause.

You should still keep track of its size if you happen to face any pain or bleeding. Try to make a habit of receiving pelvic exams every year just to be safe.

Although you can’t get rid of fibroids on your own, there are still things to help with the pain or discomfort you may be feeling. Once fibroids develop on the outside of the uterus, you may notice a lump on your tummy. You can lie down and place a hot pack or water bottle on your lower midsection to alleviate the pain. You’d have to be consistent with it numerous times a day. You can also take pain relievers, like ibuprofen.

Other options include:

Hormone Therapy

To keep the fibroid from growing, your obgyn may advise that you stop taking birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy. In other cases, however, they may prescribe birth control pills to help limit the bleeding and anemia from fibroids, even though the hormones can make fibroids grow.

GnRH Agonists

GnRH is a hormone your body naturally produces. An agonist medicine counteracts that hormone, and your obstetrician may prescribe one to shrink fibroids and reduce anemia. These drugs don’t come cheap. You shouldn’t take them for more than 6 months because they can increase the likelihood of you getting osteoporosis, which weakens your bones. Your doctor may also prescribe a small dose of progestin, another hormone, to make osteoporosis less possible. When you stop taking a GnRH agonist, the likeliness of your fibroids growing back exists.

There are a few alternatives that you might want to think about.

Fibroid embolization can shrink a fibroid. Your doctor would be injecting polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) into the arteries, which ends up feeding the fibroid. The PVA cuts off the blood supply to the fibroid, causing it to shrink. It’s not surgery, but you might have to spend a couple of nights in the hospital because you could face nausea, vomiting, and pain within the first set of days afterward.

Endometrial ablation is a procedure where doctors break apart the lining of the uterus to reduce the flow of the bleeding connected to tiny fibroids.

Myomectomy is a surgery to weed out fibroids. If you plan to become pregnant, your obgyn may highly suggest this option overs. Keep in mind that scarring can happen, when the last thing you want is to end up infertile. You’d have to be patient and wait 4-6 months after surgery before you attempt to conceive. In the vast majority of women, symptoms tend to go away following a myomectomy. But in others, the fibroids return. Whether it works has to do with how many fibroids you have and whether the surgeon is able to clear them all out. A myomectomy may be abdominal surgery, or your surgeon may use a hysteroscope or laparoscope to take out the fibroids without having to make a large cut on your stomach. There is also an experimental system that uses MRI-guided ultrasound energy to find the fibroids and diminish or destroy them.

Hysterectomy is surgery that removes the uterus. Many women don’t require such drastic treatment. Note that you won’t be able to get pregnant after this operation.

As a female obgyn in Fort Lauderdale, Dr. Ghea is able to offer assistance along with treatment to her patients who experience uterine fibroids. She always looks to ensure her patients’ comfort whenever they visit her office. For those looking for a Plantation obgyn group, feel free to make an appointment with Dr. Ghea at Westside OB/GYN Group by calling 954-473-2011 or filling out an online request.

After a woman’s body has experienced childbirth, she may notice a lot of changes to her body. Some may be positive, and others may be a little more uncomfortable, embarrassing, and downright annoying.

One of these unpleasant, yet sometimes unavoidable post-pregnancy conditions is stress urinary incontinence.

Despite its name, stress urinary incontinence has nothing to do with psychological or mental stress. Here, stress refers to the pressure put on the bladder during some sort of physical movement which then causes an unintentional loss of urine. This health condition is much more common in women than men, mainly because childbirth is a main cause. Stress incontinence happens as a result of the weakening of muscles or tissues in the body that support the bladder and regulate the release of urine. When a woman gives birth naturally, there is a chance of tissue or nerve damage that can cause poor function of the pelvic floor muscles or the sphincter. Stress urinary incontinence can also be seen in women who have delivered their children by cesarean as well.

Women who have stress urinary incontinence may experience leakage during activities such as exercise and sexual intercourse, and even simple movements such as standing up, coughing, sneezing or laughing. The condition can become worse if you are a smoker, since that causes excessive coughing, or if you have an illness that causes chronic coughing and sneezing. Obesity can also worsen stress urinary incontinence, as can any kind of high-impact activity.

Some women will experience stress incontinence right after delivery, and others may not until much later. Either way, it can have a drastic effect on a woman’s self-esteem, as well as their work and social life. If your symptoms affect your daily life, it is strongly advised to speak with a doctor. Dr. Ghea, a female obgyn in Fort Lauderdale, is available to talk with you about your personal experience with stress urinary incontinence, and will offer her best women’s health tips regarding how to treat it.

There are various medications and surgeries that can help alleviate stress urinary incontinence, but there are plenty of natural remedies for treating stress urinary incontinence too, such as the following:

  1. Do kegel exercises, which flex the same muscles used to stop urinary flow.
  2. Start a fitness regimen to get rid of any excess belly fat, which can put pressure on the bladder and pelvic muscles.
  3. Make sure you are getting enough magnesium, a mineral that helps with muscle and nerve function, and vitamin D, which studies show can reduce the risk of incontinence.   
  4. If you’re a smoker, quit. Now. All that unnecessary coughing is not helping.
  5. Try acupuncture, as it can help with balancing out the body as whole.
  6. Cut out caffeine (or at the very least, cut back). It’s a diuretic that can contribute to bladder irritation and stimulate muscle contractions, which can cause incontinence.
  7. Drink lots of water. Staying hydrated will help you go to the bathroom on a regular basis, and keep you from getting constipated, which can cause incontinence.

If you are suffering from stress urinary incontinence and looking for treatment advice from an obgyn in Plantation, Dr. Ghea is here to help. Appointments can be made with her at Westside OB/GYN Group, a Plantation obgyn office, by calling 954-473-2011.