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Category Archives: GYN

Choosing the right OB/GYN to deliver your baby and provide prenatal care can be one of the most intimidating and toughest decisions for you to make. But there is no need to stress. Here are some of my best women’s health tips for picking the ideal OB/GYN for you.

Choosing an OB/GYN has to do with far more than just prenatal care.  You’ll also have to pay several types of visits, even when you’re not pregnant, for things like Pap smears, breast exams, discussing options for birth control, and other types of preventative care.  

Make sure your insurance plan covers preventative and prenatal care. If you need to locate a new provider, I recommend that you call your insurance provider and review your benefits, more specifically your prenatal benefits. Find out what areas of your care you’re responsible for. In particular, ask about tests such as genetic screening. Request a list of not only which doctors and hospitals are covered, but also which ones are considered in-network as your out of pocket costs may differ for in network and out of network covered providers. 

Once you know which doctors are covered on your insurance, your best option is to get a personal referral. Ask your family, friends, coworkers and primary care physician. A board-certified physician is a physician who has voluntarily committed to advance their knowledge base and stay up-to-date after wrapping up medical school and residency. This extra step shows that they keep up with the latest advancements in their specialty. You might want to schedule a preconception appointment so that you can meet the new doctor and confer your questions and preferences. This also gives you the opportunity to get a sense of how the two of you will get along. Go with your gut instinct. Sometimes you’ll just naturally click well with a new physician!

After you have found out which hospitals are covered by your insurance, it is important to be familiar with a few things about the hospital where you decide to deliver. While aesthetics and pretty Labor and Delivery Suites are nice, it is also crucial for you to know what level NICU your hospital provides just in case your baby needs those services. See what type of prenatal and lactation classes they offer.

With all the options that exist for birthing your baby, you and your designated obgyn should be completely committed to your birthing plan. If you come to a disagreement, there could be unnecessary tension. This is why getting the right person to deliver your baby is so imperative.

The  OB/GYN you seek out must have hospital privileges in your preferred hospital for delivery. If they do not, if an emergency were to arise, your obgyn won’t able to be there for the birth.

Save yourself some time by finding your OB/GYN’s availability on weekends and after hours. If you have any questions or concerns outside of normal business hours, it’s important that you know the best way to reach out to them during those hours, whether it’s through a phone call or patient portal.

If you’re looking for an OB/GYNs in the Fort Lauderdale Plantation area, Dr. Ghea is happy to take care of you. She will provide you with everything you may need with the utmost care you deserve. To make an appointment with her, stop by Westside OB/GYN group, a Plantation obgyn office, or call 954-473-2011.

As there are several treatment options for fibroids, it’s hard to pick out the best course of action.

There are plenty of women with uterine fibroids that don’t come across any signs or symptoms, or experience moderately irritating but bearable signs and symptoms. Treatment for fibroids may vary between no treatment whatsoever to surgery. Unless fibroids are causing excessive bleeding, discomfort, or bladder issues, treatment for the most part isn’t necessary.

The good news is that not all fibroids expand. Even those bigger in size may not lead to any symptoms, and most become smaller after menopause.

You should still keep track of its size if you happen to face any pain or bleeding. Try to make a habit of receiving pelvic exams every year just to be safe.

Although you can’t get rid of fibroids on your own, there are still things to help with the pain or discomfort you may be feeling. Once fibroids develop on the outside of the uterus, you may notice a lump on your tummy. You can lie down and place a hot pack or water bottle on your lower midsection to alleviate the pain. You’d have to be consistent with it numerous times a day. You can also take pain relievers, like ibuprofen.

Other options include:

Hormone Therapy

To keep the fibroid from growing, your obgyn may advise that you stop taking birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy. In other cases, however, they may prescribe birth control pills to help limit the bleeding and anemia from fibroids, even though the hormones can make fibroids grow.

GnRH Agonists

GnRH is a hormone your body naturally produces. An agonist medicine counteracts that hormone, and your obstetrician may prescribe one to shrink fibroids and reduce anemia. These drugs don’t come cheap. You shouldn’t take them for more than 6 months because they can increase the likelihood of you getting osteoporosis, which weakens your bones. Your doctor may also prescribe a small dose of progestin, another hormone, to make osteoporosis less possible. When you stop taking a GnRH agonist, the likeliness of your fibroids growing back exists.

There are a few alternatives that you might want to think about.

Fibroid embolization can shrink a fibroid. Your doctor would be injecting polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) into the arteries, which ends up feeding the fibroid. The PVA cuts off the blood supply to the fibroid, causing it to shrink. It’s not surgery, but you might have to spend a couple of nights in the hospital because you could face nausea, vomiting, and pain within the first set of days afterward.

Endometrial ablation is a procedure where doctors break apart the lining of the uterus to reduce the flow of the bleeding connected to tiny fibroids.

Myomectomy is a surgery to weed out fibroids. If you plan to become pregnant, your obgyn may highly suggest this option overs. Keep in mind that scarring can happen, when the last thing you want is to end up infertile. You’d have to be patient and wait 4-6 months after surgery before you attempt to conceive. In the vast majority of women, symptoms tend to go away following a myomectomy. But in others, the fibroids return. Whether it works has to do with how many fibroids you have and whether the surgeon is able to clear them all out. A myomectomy may be abdominal surgery, or your surgeon may use a hysteroscope or laparoscope to take out the fibroids without having to make a large cut on your stomach. There is also an experimental system that uses MRI-guided ultrasound energy to find the fibroids and diminish or destroy them.

Hysterectomy is surgery that removes the uterus. Many women don’t require such drastic treatment. Note that you won’t be able to get pregnant after this operation.

As a female obgyn in Fort Lauderdale, Dr. Ghea is able to offer assistance along with treatment to her patients who experience uterine fibroids. She always looks to ensure her patients’ comfort whenever they visit her office. For those looking for a Plantation obgyn group, feel free to make an appointment with Dr. Ghea at Westside OB/GYN Group by calling 954-473-2011 or filling out an online request.

After a woman’s body has experienced childbirth, she may notice a lot of changes to her body. Some may be positive, and others may be a little more uncomfortable, embarrassing, and downright annoying.

One of these unpleasant, yet sometimes unavoidable post-pregnancy conditions is stress urinary incontinence.

Despite its name, stress urinary incontinence has nothing to do with psychological or mental stress. Here, stress refers to the pressure put on the bladder during some sort of physical movement which then causes an unintentional loss of urine. This health condition is much more common in women than men, mainly because childbirth is a main cause. Stress incontinence happens as a result of the weakening of muscles or tissues in the body that support the bladder and regulate the release of urine. When a woman gives birth naturally, there is a chance of tissue or nerve damage that can cause poor function of the pelvic floor muscles or the sphincter. Stress urinary incontinence can also be seen in women who have delivered their children by cesarean as well.

Women who have stress urinary incontinence may experience leakage during activities such as exercise and sexual intercourse, and even simple movements such as standing up, coughing, sneezing or laughing. The condition can become worse if you are a smoker, since that causes excessive coughing, or if you have an illness that causes chronic coughing and sneezing. Obesity can also worsen stress urinary incontinence, as can any kind of high-impact activity.

Some women will experience stress incontinence right after delivery, and others may not until much later. Either way, it can have a drastic effect on a woman’s self-esteem, as well as their work and social life. If your symptoms affect your daily life, it is strongly advised to speak with a doctor. Dr. Ghea, a female obgyn in Fort Lauderdale, is available to talk with you about your personal experience with stress urinary incontinence, and will offer her best women’s health tips regarding how to treat it.

There are various medications and surgeries that can help alleviate stress urinary incontinence, but there are plenty of natural remedies for treating stress urinary incontinence too, such as the following:

  1. Do kegel exercises, which flex the same muscles used to stop urinary flow.
  2. Start a fitness regimen to get rid of any excess belly fat, which can put pressure on the bladder and pelvic muscles.
  3. Make sure you are getting enough magnesium, a mineral that helps with muscle and nerve function, and vitamin D, which studies show can reduce the risk of incontinence.   
  4. If you’re a smoker, quit. Now. All that unnecessary coughing is not helping.
  5. Try acupuncture, as it can help with balancing out the body as whole.
  6. Cut out caffeine (or at the very least, cut back). It’s a diuretic that can contribute to bladder irritation and stimulate muscle contractions, which can cause incontinence.
  7. Drink lots of water. Staying hydrated will help you go to the bathroom on a regular basis, and keep you from getting constipated, which can cause incontinence.

If you are suffering from stress urinary incontinence and looking for treatment advice from an obgyn in Plantation, Dr. Ghea is here to help. Appointments can be made with her at Westside OB/GYN Group, a Plantation obgyn office, by calling 954-473-2011.