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Obstetrics & Gynecology

Dr. Ghea Adeboyejo, MD

Dr. Ghea E Adeboyejo, MD is a Doctor primarily located in Plantation, FL. She has 24 years of experience. Her specialties include Obstetrics and Gynecology. Dr. Adeboyejo is affiliated with Holy Cross Hospital. She speaks English.

ABOUT ME

Now that you just had your baby, you’ve got a lot to think about: when to feed them, what to do when they cry... 

And how to lose that stubborn baby fat you packed on during your pregnancy. 

Every new mom is eager to get back her pre-baby body, but one of the most important things to keep in mind is to be patient with yourself. 

Here are some tips to help you lose those extra pounds after pregnancy and feel confident in your body again.

Getting back to your pre-pregnancy weight can realistically happen in about 6 to 12 months following delivery. Most women lose half of their baby weight by 6 weeks after childbirth (postpartum). The rest typically comes off over the next set of months. 

A healthy diet with regular exercise will help you drop the pounds. Breastfeeding can also help with postpartum weight loss.

As a new mom, your body needs maximum nutrition, especially if you're nursing. 

You need to give your body the time to fully recover from childbirth. If you lose weight too quickly after childbirth, it may make your recovery time take longer. Give yourself until your 6-week checkup before making an attempt to slim down. If you’re breastfeeding, wait until your baby is at least 2 months old and your milk supply has normalized before drastically cutting calories.

Set attainable goals, like losing about a pound and a half a week. You can accomplish this by eating healthy foods and incorporating exercise once you’re approved by your OBGYN for regular physical activity.

Women who exclusively breastfeed need about 500 more calories per day than they did before pregnancy. Get these calories from healthy choices like fruits and veggies, whole grains, low-fat dairy, and lean protein.

Whatever you do, make sure you don’t drop below the minimum number of calories you’re required to have. 

If you’re breastfeeding, you’ll want to lose weight at a slow pace. Weight loss that happens too quickly can make you produce less milk. Losing about a pound and a half (670 grams) a week shouldn’t affect your milk supply or your health. 

Breastfeeding causes your body to burn calories, and that will definitely help with losing weight. If you’re patient, you might be in for a pleasant surprise at how much weight you lose naturally while breastfeeding.

There are a few strategies where you can eat to lose weight. These healthy eating tips will help you lose weight safely.

Don’t skip meals! With a new baby, many new moms forget to make time for a meal. If you don’t eat, you’ll have less energy, and it definitely won’t help you lose weight. Aim to eat at least 5 to 6 small meals throughout your day with healthy snacks in between (instead of 3 bigger meals).

Eat breakfast. Even if you aren’t used to having breakfast, get into the habit of eating every morning. Not only will it give you the energy you need to start your day, but it’ll also keep you from feeling drowsy later on.

Slow down. When you take your time eating, you’ll notice that it’s easier to tell that you’re full. As tempting as it may be for you to multitask, try to focus on your meal one bite at a time since you’ll be less prone to overeat.

Pick nonfat or low-fat dairy products

When you’re craving a snack, try to go for foods that include fiber and protein to help keep you full (i.e. raw bell pepper or carrot with bean dip, apple slices with peanut butter, or a slice of whole-wheat toast with a hard-boiled egg). 

Stay hydrated and drink at least 12 cups a day. Keep a water bottle close to where you normally feed the baby. That way you'll remember to quench your thirst when they do.

Limit drinks like sodas, juices, and other beverages with added sugar and calories. They can add up and make it harder for you to lose weight.

Choose broiled or baked over fried foods.

Limit sweets, sugar, saturated fat and trans fats.

Don’t crash and burn. Avoid going on a crash diet (not eating enough) or a fad diet (popular diets that restrict certain kinds of foods and nutrients). They’ll probably make you drop pounds in the beginning, but those first few pounds you lose are fluids that will come right back. 

Other pounds you lose on a crash diet may be muscle instead of fat. You’ll gain back any fat you lose on a crash diet the moment you get back to your old eating habits. 

Be Realistic. You might not be able to return to your exact pre-pregnancy shape. For many women, pregnancy causes lasting changes in the body. You might have a softer belly, wider hips, and a larger waistline. Make your goals regarding your new body realistic

Exercise will also help you lose fat rather than muscle. 

Once you’re prepared to start losing weight, eat a bit less and move a little more day by day. Although you may feel the urge to push yourself into a hard routine for fast weight loss, rapid weight loss isn’t healthy and takes a toll on your body. 

You don’t want to overdo it. Just a quick walk around the block with your baby in the stroller is a great way to start adding exercise to your daily routine.

If you want more women’s health tips like these or are still struggling to lose that stubborn baby fat, schedule an appointment with Dr. Ghea, a top female OBGYN in Fort Lauderdale, by calling 954-473-2011, visiting her office at Westside OB/GYN Group, or filling out an online request. 

She’ll be more than happy to get you closer to achieving your goal - to be a happy, healthy, and positive role model for your little one!

Hurricane season is here. For those of you who are expecting, you should take extra precautions for the sake of you and your little one’s health and safety during a storm. 

Here are some simple safety tips for pregnant women in the case of a Hurricane.

  • Make a list of all hospitals that provide obstetric care along your evacuation route, as well as in your final destination location should you choose to evacuate. 
  • If it’s close to your delivery date or you’re considered high-risk, be sure to speak with your healthcare provider’s office to make your whereabouts known to them. Discuss whether it is safe for you to leave prior to the storm. Have phone numbers and locations of local obstetricians in case you can’t reach your usual health care provider.
  • If you decide to evacuate, have a copy of your medical documents, such as prenatal care, immunizations and medications. Don’t forget your hospital bag! Should you evacuate or go to a shelter, notify necessary personnel right away that you’re pregnant. Make sure to have all information regarding local hospitals in the area handy.
  • Create a family communication strategy so everyone knows what has to be done before, during, and after the storm.

Though all these tips are important, remember that hurricanes don’t directly cause labor to occur. Labor is anticipated any time between 37 to 42 weeks and is something that should be planned for properly. With that being said, here are some more tips to make sure things run smoothly in the event that there is a Hurricane. 

  • If you have to relocate, bring any medications, like prenatal vitamins and prescriptions. You should bring enough to last up to around two weeks.
  • Learn the signs of preterm labor.Contact help as soon as possible if you experience any feeling of your baby pushing down, abdominal cramps, low, subtle backaches, leaking vaginal fluid or bleeding, or contractions every 10 minutes or more.

Planning for the birth of a child, especially during hurricane season, is not easy. Having a female OBGYN to guide you along the way while also providing you with more women’s health tips like these can come in handy for times like these. To schedule an appointment with Dr. Ghea, an OBGYN in Plantation, contact Westside OB/GYN Group at 954-473-2011 to discuss your options, ease the process, and make this occasion free from stress. 

It’s summer time, and you know what that means! It’s hot, it’s humid, and if you’re pregnant, you’re feeling heavy with child. Heat and humidity is already unpleasant for most people, but it takes an even greater toll on pregnant women. Don’t let this discourage you, there are tons of ways for you to cope with the heat without losing your cool!

Sunscreen and the shade are your best friends — always apply sunscreen with a high SPF and stay in the shade whenever possible. Ultraviolet (UV) rays can make your skin more susceptible to chloasma, which are those unwanted dark splotches on the face or arms that sometimes appear throughout pregnancy. 

Being pregnant is no excuse to deprive yourself of outdoor activities, but you just have to make sure to take extra precautions in order to protect yourself and your baby. During pregnancy, women should be especially careful when it comes to sun exposure because it may lead to overheating and dehydration.

While you're pregnant, your body temperature is slightly higher than usual, so it’s inevitable that the added heat from the outside temperature can make you feel uncomfortable.

Since pregnant women already have a certain degree of heat intolerance, it gives all the more reason for moms-to-be to be consistent with keeping a close eye on the heat warnings. 

If the heat index (how hot the temperature feels due to the combination of humidity and heat) is up in the 90s, that's the kind of day to stay indoors as much as possible with plenty of air conditioning. Applying a cool, damp washcloth to the back of your neck, your forehead, or the top of your head is also another great way to keep your body temperature down.

If you perspire heavily as a result of the heat, make sure you drink a great deal of fluids. Water is always good, but so are orange juice and sports drinks, which substitute for electrolytes that are sweating away with the heat.

Too much water can be as much of an issue as too little, causing a condition referred to as water intoxication. Over hydrating with water is actually a thing, and it can water down your electrolytes, which can result in fatigued muscles, cramps, and in extreme scenarios, unconsciousness.

If you're thirsty, then chances are you're already dehydrated, so make sure you have something to drink with you at all times. Here are some more tips to get you through the heat of the summer!

  • As Dory says, just keep swimming! Not only does it cool you off, but it also helps by taking some of the pressure off your sciatic nerve. Swimming in the ocean is fine, just as long as the waves aren’t strong enough to knock you down.
  • Wear breathable fabrics to avoid sweating. This will keep you cooler while also helping to prevent heat rash that can surface under your breasts and abdomen, which is a common predicament for pregnant women.
  • Bring a water-filled squirt bottle with you so that you can spray yourself whenever you start to feel hot.
  • Exercise at cooler times of the day and avoid engaging in physical activity to the point of overheating.

When it comes to working out, always get the okay from your OBGYN before you decide to start or continue an exercise routine.

Breathing is also a very essential component in keeping cool. Breathing releases heat, so make sure to maintain a healthy breathing pattern (some people either breathe too quickly or too slowly), and if you're having a hard time breathing because of things you can’t do much about like allergies or asthma, then stay indoors. 

If you also happen to experience the first sign of weakness, fatigue, shortness of breath, dizziness, lightheadedness, or excessive thirst, get indoors.

Another common dilemma among summer pregnancies is leg swelling, or physiologic edema. If the second half of pregnancy goes on during the summer months, the degree of leg swelling can increase drastically.

If you experience any leg swelling while pregnant, there are definitely ways to go about this. Simply lying down for 30 to 60 minutes a day and keeping your legs elevated while sleeping will help. To do so, make sure to roll up a towel or blanket under your mattress at the foot of the bed. It’d also be wise to wear comfy shoes. You could also try wearing a pair that’s half a size bigger than your typical size. 

Try to set time aside to walk at least two to three times a week at cooler times of the day. 

Whatever you do, don’t wear constrictive clothes, particularly around the waistline, and definitely avoid standing in one place for too long. Try your best to reduce your intake of salt without completely taking it out of your diet, since the iodide contained in the salt is good for the fetus. Don’t take any diuretic substances either, because the loss of electrolytes could potentially endanger the fetus as well.

Now that you know the dos and don’ts, don’t be a summer bummer! 

If you follow all these tips, you should be able to beat the heat and get back to savoring the anticipation of awaiting your baby’s arrival. If you’re looking for other women’s health care tips like these or simply want more guidelines to get you through your summer pregnancy, Dr. Ghea is the female OBGYN to ask. With Dr. Ghea, there is no such thing as a silly question, so ask away! 

She’ll make sure you are completely comfortable throughout the entire process. If you’re interested in scheduling an appointment, you can either fill out an online application or call 954-473-2011 to visit her Plantation OBGYN office at Westside OB/GYN Group.

If you’re trying to have a baby, being healthy before, during and after pregnancy encompasses so many different aspects of your life. A healthy momma-to-be and a healthy pregnancy go hand-in-hand. Here are some tips for having a healthy pregnancy that can come in handy when you’re expecting.

Early Prenatal Care

Make sure to find a good OBGYN and determine a place where you plan to deliver. during the early stages of your pregnancy so that you get the prenatal care that you need. It’s always best to plan the necessary ultrasound scans and tests ahead of time, so that you’re not only aware of them, but also well-prepared.

Eat Wholesome and Nutritious Food

Your body feeds off of energy. Eating whole grains, fresh fruits and veggies, eggs, organic meats and dairy products will give you and your baby the right amount of nutrients. These foods are made up of minerals, vitamins, essential fatty acids, amino acids and other essential nutrients. Although you need food to keep you going, you also need to watch what you eat. By all means, avoid junk food!

Drink Plenty of Water

Staying hydrated helps with regulating your amniotic fluid levels. Try and make it your daily goal to drink at least 10 glasses of water. Dehydration can lead to morning sickness, drowsiness, and cramps, as well as contractions during the second and third trimesters. Drinking water also helps prevent constipation, hemorrhoids, UTIs, fatigue, headaches, swelling, and other uncomfortable pregnancy symptoms.

Take Prenatal Vitamins

During the time when you are trying to conceive, it's wise to start taking prenatal vitamins. Your baby's neural cord, which becomes the brain and spinal cord, develops during the first month of pregnancy It's important you get nutrients such as folic acid, calcium, and iron from the very beginning.

Exercise Regularly

Your body is going to go through many changes. One of the most prominent changes is your shape and weight. Fitting regular exercise into your schedule will help you stay healthy and flexible. Exercise helps to cope with stress and goes a long way in helping you in terms of labor and motherhood.

Staying active is important for your overall well-being and can help you control your weight, improve circulation, enhance your mood, and get better sleep.

Pilates, yoga, swimming, and walking are also great activities for most pregnant women, but be sure to check with your OBGYN beforehand. Try and devote 30 minutes of exercise most days of the week. Listen to your body, though, and don't push your limit.

Get Some Rest

Getting enough sleep is important during pregnancy. Try and get as much sleep as you can, and rest your feet as much as possible. Some yoga and deep breathing can also help you relax and stay calm. You may feel like you're busy now, but the moment the baby comes, you'll have even less time for yourself. 

Avoid Alcohol, Drugs and Smoking

Avoid alcohol because it reaches your baby through the blood and can cause birth defects. Drugs and smoking are also equally as dangerous because of their effect on the baby’s growth and health. Smoking cigarettes decreases oxygen flow to your baby and is associated with preterm birth and other complications. 

Reduce Caffeine and Recharge with Fruits

It’s much healthier for you to recharge yourself with fruit instead of caffeine. Caffeine has been known to increase the chances of miscarriage. Pregnant women are low on iron, and caffeine makes it more challenging for your body to absorb iron. Most doctors advise limiting caffeine throughout pregnancy. If you're used to your morning java, replace that urge with a quick pick-me-up by nibbling on some fruit. 

Be environmentally aware

If you’re exposed to toxic chemicals, pesticides, radioactive elements, lead, or mercury at your workplace or home on the regular, you should reach out to your OBGYN for advice since these are hazardous to you and your baby.

See Your Dentist

See your dentist before you get pregnant and brush your teeth daily. Hormonal changes during pregnancy causes weaker gums. An increase in estrogen and progesterone levels can cause bleeding and tender gums. So, oral care is especially crucial throughout pregnancy.

Watch Your Emotional Health

Due to hormonal shifts during pregnancy, you’ll probably go through occasional mood swings and emotional ups and downs. If you think you’re depressed and it’s affecting you, don’t be afraid to ask for help to try and bounce back to normalcy.

Strengthening Pelvic Floor Muscles

Kegels strengthen the pelvic floor muscles that support your bladder, bowels, and uterus. If done properly, these simple exercises can help promise a smoother delivery and prevent future problems with incontinence. The best part about it is that nobody can tell you're doing them, so if you wanted to, you could practice kegels whether you’re sitting in the car or standing in line at the grocery store. All you have to do is practice squeezing as if you're stopping the flow of urine when you use the bathroom, hold it for three seconds, then relax for three, and then repeat this 10 times.

Track Your Weight Gain

A steady increase in your weight indicates your baby’s growth. Keeping track of your weight is important to ensure that you’re on the right track. Normal weight gain during pregnancy is 25 to 35 pounds, if you are at a normal weight at the beginning of your pregnancy. Your doctor’s recommendations will vary if you are above or below a normal BMI.

Dress comfy

Go ahead and get yourself comfortable clothes. As your weight and shape will be changing rapidly, putting on tight clothing could be very uncomfortable and in some cases, even dangerous for you and your baby..

Wear Appropriate Footwear

As your pregnancy progresses, your weight gain shifts the center of gravity and applies a painful pressure on your feet. So, it's beneficial to wear comfy, nonrestrictive shoes when you're pregnant. Many expectant moms find they need a bigger shoe size even after they’ve given birth, so go a step up if you have to.

Take Care of Your Skin

Pregnancy makes your skin more sensitive to sunlight, so you’re more prone to sunburn and chloasma, those dark, blotchy spots that sometimes show up on the face. Remember to apply sunscreen, wear a hat, and put on your favorite pair of shades before heading outdoors!

Pamper Yourself

Although you have to watch what you eat, listen to your body and give in to the cravings that pop up sometimes. Treat yourself with a lunch out, a manicure, a much-needed day out with your friends, or by going out for a quiet stroll. These activities relieve both you and the baby.

Educate Yourself

Even if this isn't your first rodeo, going to a childbirth class will make you feel more prepared for delivery. Not only will you have the opportunity to learn more about childbirth and infant care, but you can ask questions and voice any concerns.

Now is also the time to review your family's medical history. Go over things with your obgyn including issues with past pregnancies, and inform them about any family tendencies of birth defects. 

Stress Management

Pregnancy-related lifestyle changes and hormonal changes can be stressful. Life during pregnancy is a rollercoaster ride and may be overwhelming. So, finding ways to control stress is important. You can manage stress by changing the way you respond to situations at home or at work. Meditation, yoga, and doing arts and crafts can help to de-stress.

Talk to Your Baby

Talking to your baby can be a remarkable and soul-soothing exercise. It helps you establish the bond and communicate with your little one. You can tell your baby how you feel about your family, the food you eat and activities that you enjoy. You could also sing and read to your baby!
If you’re looking to speak with an obstetrician in Fort Lauderdale for more pregnancy care tips or general women’s health tips, give Dr. Ghea, a top female obgyn in Fort Lauderdale, a call at 954-473-2011 to set up an appointment at Westside OB/GYN Group.

If you’ve ever gotten a Pap smear, it’s equally important to get familiar with the lowdown on Colposcopy. But to do so, you must first understand what it actually means.

So, what exactly is a Colposcopy anyway?

Well, for starters, a colposcopy is a procedure to closely examine your cervix, vagina and vulva. The doctor may at this time also perform a biopsy, which is used in attempts to help diagnose cervical cancer.

While a Pap smear helps your OBGYN look out for any cell changes on the cervix, a colposcopy inspects those abnormal cells with the use of a microscope and bright light. The colposcope, which is a decently-sized microscope, does not get inserted into the vagina, but magnifies the cervix to have a better view of any sort of changes. It's essentially a slightly more intricate version of a Pap smear.

Though this information may seem a bit on the scary side, there’s no need to freak out or be on the fence about it. The procedure isn’t something to be afraid of – in fact, it is very similar to the process of a pelvic exam. You’ll lay down with your legs in stirrups while your OBGYN inserts the speculum. The colposcope is positioned 8 to 10 inches from the vagina with a bright light. Your provider will use a vinegar solution or something of that nature to help highlight any abnormal areas and tissues.

Colposcopies are usually suggested by your OBGYN if your Pap smear shows any abnormal cervical cells. There are 2 types of biopsies: the one that removes tissue from outside your cervix, and the other that takes tissue from inside the opening of your cervix. Sometimes you are required to have more than one biopsy.

Try not to schedule your examination while you are menstruating. For at least 24 hours before the examination, you shouldn’t do any form of douching, or use tampons along with any other products that enter the vagina, have sex, or use any vaginal medications.

Some might suggest taking a pain reliever like acetaminophen or ibuprofen just before your colposcopy appointment. You want to be as comfortable and relaxed as possible, while avoiding any chances of slight pain or discomfort.

If abnormal tissue is found, small pieces of tissue can be removed from your vagina and/or cervix thanks to the use of biopsy instruments. 

Your OBGYN might apply a solution to the area of the biopsy to decrease bleeding.

A colposcopy normally doesn't cause any more discomfort than an average Pap smear. Some women, however, tend to feel a sting from the acetic acid solution used for the procedure.

Cervical biopsies can cause some issues like a slight pinch from when each tissue gets removed, discomfort, cramping, and pain, that can last for up to 1 to 2 days, or even slight vaginal bleeding and a coffee-colored vaginal discharge that could last up to a week.

There’s no recovery time unless you go through a biopsy. You can go about your daily activities once it’s over with.

In the case that you do end up having a biopsy during your colposcopy, you might need to limit your activity to allow your cervix to heal.

Reach out to your OBGYN if you feel any heavy vaginal bleeding, severe pain in the lower abdomen, or a fever or chills following after your examination.

Remember how important it is to get regular Pap smears as it’s always better to be safe than sorry! If you are looking for a female obgyn in Fort Lauderdale who you can feel comfortable with,, Dr. Ghea is the one for you to call! She is more than happy to take care of you while also providing you with all the women’s health tips you may need. Book an appointment with her today at Westside OB/GYN Group, a Plantation obgyn office, by calling 954-473-2011.

Endometriosis, sometimes referred to as "endo," is a common health issue among women. Its name comes from the word endometrium, the tissue that usually lines the uterus or womb. Endometriosis occurs when tissue matching the uterine lining (the lining of the womb) spreads outside of your uterus and on other parts in your body where it doesn't belong. Endometriosis is typically found in the lower abdomen or pelvis, but can develop anywhere in the body. 

In many instances, endometriosis can turn up on your ovaries, fallopian tubes, tissues that keep the uterus in position, and the outermost surface of the uterus. Other areas for growths may include the vagina, cervix, vulva, bowel, bladder, or rectum. It is rare for endometriosis to show up in other sections of the body, such as the lungs, brain, and skin.

Women with endometriosis more often than not experience lower abdominal pain, pain with periods,pain during or after sex, digestive problems, pain with urination, and may even struggle with infertility. However, some women with endometriosis may not face any symptoms whatsoever.

It’s important that you speak with your obgyn if you start to notice or feel any of these symptoms.

No one knows the exact cause of this disease, but there are several theories. A few possible explanations would be:

  • Issues with menstrual period flow. Retrograde menstrual flow is the most probable cause of endometriosis. Some of the tissue dispersed throughout your period flows through the fallopian tube into other areas of the body, like the pelvis.
  • Genetics. Because endometriosis can sometimes be hereditary, it may be passed down in your genes.
  • Immune system. A bad immune system may fail to detect and wipe out endometrial tissue growing outside of the uterus. Immune system disorders and ovarian cancer are more common in women with endometriosis.
  • Hormones. The hormone estrogen seems to boost endometriosis.
  • Surgery. When you undergo a surgery in the abdominal area, such as a C-section or hysterectomy, endometrial tissue could be picked up and moved. For example, endometrial tissue has been spotted in abdominal scars.

The major drawback of endometriosis is impaired fertility. About one-third to one-half of women with endometriosis have a hard time getting pregnant.

Infertility can happen from endometriosis creating adherences that entrap the egg close to the ovary, making it challenging for it to properly travel down the fallopian tube to be fertilized by sperm.

But don’t let this scare you! According to the Mayo Clinic, plenty of women with mild to moderate endometriosis are still able to get pregnant – it just might take more time, so be patient with your body!

There are a couple of factors that determine a woman's treatment, including age, the severity of her symptoms, and whether the patient wants to become pregnant. Be sure to discuss your treatment options with your OB/GYN.

If you’re not looking to get pregnant, hormonal birth control is normally the first step in treatment. This may consist of:

  • Extended-cycle (you only get a few periods a year) or continuous cycle (you don’t get periods) birth control. These types of hormonal contraceptives are offered in the form of a pill or a shot and help stop bleeding and diminish or get rid of pain.
  • IUD to help minimize pain and bleeding. The hormonal IUD prevents pregnancy for up to seven years (how many years may vary based on which brand you choose). But the hormonal IUD might not take care of your pain and bleeding due to endometriosis for that long.

Hormonal treatment functions only as long as it’s taken and is suited for women who don’t experience severe pain or symptoms.

If you are attempting to get pregnant, your obgyn might prescribe a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist. This medicine keeps the body from developing the hormones responsible for ovulation and the growth of endometriosis. This treatment triggers a temporary menopause, but it also helps regulate the spread of endometriosis. Once you stop taking the medicine, you’ll start getting your period again, but you may have a better shot at getting pregnant.

Surgery is mainly an option for severe symptoms, when hormones aren’t doing the trick or if you’re dealing with fertility complications. During the operation, the surgeon can track down any areas of endometriosis and can take out the endometriosis patches. Following surgery, hormone treatment is commonly restarted unless you’re trying to get pregnant.

Alternative treatments you can try, by yourself or with any of the treatments previously mentioned, involve:

  • Pain medicine. For mild symptoms, your OB/GYN may recommend taking over-the-counter medicines for pain, such as ibuprofen (Advil and Motrin) or naproxen (Aleve).
  • Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies. Some women find alleviation from pain thanks to therapies like acupuncture, chiropractic care, herbs like cinnamon twig or licorice root, or supplements, such as thiamine (vitamin B1), magnesium, or omega-3 fatty acids.

If you come across symptoms of endometriosis, you’re more than welcome to sit down and chat with Dr. Ghea, a female obgyn in Fort Lauderdale. Once you speak with her, she’ll figure out the best method to diagnose and treat it based on what you’re going through and happily walk you through the process, whether it’s to help you get pregnant, or just to feel better. To schedule an appointment, give her a call at 954-473-2011, or stop by her Plantation obgyn office at Westside OB/GYN Group.

It’s that time of the month again, which means all you’re going to want to do is stay under your covers as you desperately wait for the cramps, bloating, and crabbiness to come to an end so you get to feel normal again. The fatigue that you experience when you get your period sometimes makes it hard to find the motivation to do any physical activity.However, having an exercise routine during your menstrual cycle can actually help lessen the symptoms, alleviating the pain that you’re used to feeling. The right workout will allow you to cope with your typical symptoms so you don't have to allow mother nature to get in the way of your daily life.

The best thing to do while exercising during your period is to pay attention to your body. Staying hydrated and drinking a good amount of water is always necessary when you're exercising, but it's especially important throughout your period. If the cramping and bloating is too heavy for you to be out and about, give yourself a freebie from the sweat sesh. But if you’re in the mood to get moving, here are seven recommended workouts that you can do.

Walking is great low-intensity cardio. Go ahead and grab your favorite pair of sneakers and go for a stroll, whether it’s around your neighborhood or through a trail in the park. Though it may not be the most intense method of exercise, you can still keep track of your steps, and burn calories by walking. 

If you’re officially over the worst of your cramps, try intensifying your workouts with a light jog. Feel free to take it slow or give yourself a break if you feel any sort of .

Pilates moves work certain muscle groups, so you can modify your exercise routine to tailor your needs. If you’re feeling pain in your lower back during your period, try roll-downs to stretch out your back and spine.

These monthly ramps, muscle fatigue, and back pain can all potentially ruin your day, but a yoga class can help you feel better. By slowly stretch out those tired and sore muscles, you may feel less pain and discomfort Many yoga poses also help boost blood flow and circulation, which serves to avoid clotting.

Try not to do inversions, as some experts believe it could cause endometriosis. You may also perform such movements on an exercise ball to apply pressure to your abdomen for support. Specific poses like the restorative pose or the cat pose enable you to stretch your back muscles at a time where you may need it most. Take on a class with a gal pal or look up yoga sessions on Youtube to find the best poses to deal with your period symptoms.

Another good method of exercise while on your period is swimming. The low-impact sport is soothing, and you won’t have to worry about bleeding out if your flow is light due to the counter-pressure of the water.

If you don’t feel like going to the gym, you can always just do some simple stretches in the comfort of your own home. The main idea is to lengthen your muscles while also taking in deep breaths to relieve aches and cramps.

Lastly, if you’re feeling up for a little bit of cardio, signing yourself up for a Zumba or Kpop dance class is a perfect option. This type of workout will not only enhance your mood, but also give you a fun way to burn major calories!
As a female obgyn in Fort Lauderdale, Dr. Ghea is more than happy to cover any questions or concerns you may have when it comes to which workout routine is best for your period. She aims to make sure that you are comfortable and open with talking about the best ways to take care of your body. For more women’s health tips like these, go to Westside OB/GYN Group, a Plantation obgyn office, or call 954-473-2011 to set up an appointment.

Choosing the right OB/GYN to deliver your baby and provide prenatal care can be one of the most intimidating and toughest decisions for you to make. But there is no need to stress. Here are some of my best women’s health tips for picking the ideal OB/GYN for you.

Choosing an OB/GYN has to do with far more than just prenatal care.  You’ll also have to pay several types of visits, even when you’re not pregnant, for things like Pap smears, breast exams, discussing options for birth control, and other types of preventative care.  

Make sure your insurance plan covers preventative and prenatal care. If you need to locate a new provider, I recommend that you call your insurance provider and review your benefits, more specifically your prenatal benefits. Find out what areas of your care you’re responsible for. In particular, ask about tests such as genetic screening. Request a list of not only which doctors and hospitals are covered, but also which ones are considered in-network as your out of pocket costs may differ for in network and out of network covered providers. 

Once you know which doctors are covered on your insurance, your best option is to get a personal referral. Ask your family, friends, coworkers and primary care physician. A board-certified physician is a physician who has voluntarily committed to advance their knowledge base and stay up-to-date after wrapping up medical school and residency. This extra step shows that they keep up with the latest advancements in their specialty. You might want to schedule a preconception appointment so that you can meet the new doctor and confer your questions and preferences. This also gives you the opportunity to get a sense of how the two of you will get along. Go with your gut instinct. Sometimes you’ll just naturally click well with a new physician!

After you have found out which hospitals are covered by your insurance, it is important to be familiar with a few things about the hospital where you decide to deliver. While aesthetics and pretty Labor and Delivery Suites are nice, it is also crucial for you to know what level NICU your hospital provides just in case your baby needs those services. See what type of prenatal and lactation classes they offer.

With all the options that exist for birthing your baby, you and your designated obgyn should be completely committed to your birthing plan. If you come to a disagreement, there could be unnecessary tension. This is why getting the right person to deliver your baby is so imperative.

The  OB/GYN you seek out must have hospital privileges in your preferred hospital for delivery. If they do not, if an emergency were to arise, your obgyn won’t able to be there for the birth.

Save yourself some time by finding your OB/GYN’s availability on weekends and after hours. If you have any questions or concerns outside of normal business hours, it’s important that you know the best way to reach out to them during those hours, whether it’s through a phone call or patient portal.

If you’re looking for an OB/GYNs in the Fort Lauderdale Plantation area, Dr. Ghea is happy to take care of you. She will provide you with everything you may need with the utmost care you deserve. To make an appointment with her, stop by Westside OB/GYN group, a Plantation obgyn office, or call 954-473-2011.